Registrar Support

Registrar Support

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If a service isn't available through the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, we've provided alternative suggestions.

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January 20 - February 19, 2023

2023 Mid-South Scholastic Art Awards

Every year, we are honored to host what some artists have called the "championships for our young artists": the Mid-South Scholastic Art Awards. Featuring more than 135 artworks by the Mid South's best and brightest creative youths, this visual celebration of the Mid South's best creativity is sure to inspire and give you hope for tomorrow.

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“Kendall” by Sydney Wickens, age 18, grade 12, Arlington High School, Drawing & Illustration, Senior Division Best in Show
“Kendall” by Sydney Wickens, age 18, grade 12, Arlington High School, Drawing & Illustration, Senior Division Best in Show

November 23rd

The Human Zoo by Kent Monkman

Experience the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art’s latest acquisition: The Human Zoo (2015) by Cree artist Kent Monkman (b. 1965).

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Kent Monkman, The Human Zoo, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Museum Purchase. 2022.7a-e
Kent Monkman, The Human Zoo, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Museum Purchase. 2022.7a-e

Frozen in Motion

In partnership with Creative Aging Memphis, the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art hosted a sculpture workshop for senior adults to exercise their creativity, explore new artmaking processes, and create their own three-dimensional artwork.

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Elvis by Judy Bilbrey
Elvis by Judy Bilbrey

New Acquisition

Memphis on the Mississippi (Ode to Tom Lee)

To further build Memphis' Art Collection, the Brooks has commissioned the Memphis-based artist Carl E. Moore to create a work inspired by our soon-to-be new location Downtown on the banks of the Mississippi River.

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Carl E. Moore, 'Memphis on the Mississippi (Ode to Tom Lee)', 2022. Acrylic on canvas.
Carl E. Moore, 'Memphis on the Mississippi (Ode to Tom Lee)', 2022. Acrylic on canvas.

Through February, 2023

Henry Ossawa Tanner: The Thankful Poor

This work is one of the artist's last known “genre” paintings—images that depict everyday or ordinary domestic scenes—before he transitioned almost exclusively to religious scenes.

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Henry Ossawa Tanner, American, 1859 - 1937, 'The Thankful Poor', 1894, oil on canvas
Henry Ossawa Tanner, American, 1859 - 1937, 'The Thankful Poor', 1894, oil on canvas

January 4 - August 29

Art of the African Diaspora

As conversations around the African Diaspora shift and evolve, so too will this display, aided by the museum actively acquiring works that reflect these varied, global experiences.

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Currently on view

Power and Absence

This reimagining of the Schilling Gallery explores the representation of women in Europe from around 1500 to 1680, known as the Renaissance and Early Baroque period. Most of the works in this room have been made by men.

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Sofonisba Anguissola, 'Self-Portrait', 1560, oil on wood panel, Memphis Park Commission Purchase, 43.11
Sofonisba Anguissola, 'Self-Portrait', 1560, oil on wood panel, Memphis Park Commission Purchase, 43.11

Frozen in Motion

In partnership with Creative Aging Memphis, the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art hosted a sculpture workshop for senior adults to exercise their creativity, explore new artmaking processes, and create their own three-dimensional artwork.

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Elvis by Judy Bilbrey
Elvis by Judy Bilbrey

Día de los Muertos Altar Show

Our annual ofrendas exhibition celebrates the tradition of honoring deceased loved ones on Día de los Muertos with altars. Coinciding with our Día de los Muertos Community Day, this exhibition displays the work of local Memphis students who have constructed ofrendas for deceased people who they admire.

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Ode To Flora, Fauna, and Frida, By Brighton Elementary 5th grade students and Art Educator Kathryn Vaughn, 2019
Ode To Flora, Fauna, and Frida, By Brighton Elementary 5th grade students and Art Educator Kathryn Vaughn, 2019

Oct 7 - Jan 8

Drawing the Curtain: Maurice Sendak's Designs for Opera and Ballet

Calling all wild things, mischievous children, and lovable characters! Come to the Brooks and be transported from page to stage to faraway places...

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Maurice Sendak, 'Diorama of Moishe scrim and flower proscenium (Where the Wild Things Are),' 1979-1983, watercolor, pen and ink, and graphite pencil on laminated paperboard. © The Maurice Sendak Foundation. The Morgan Library & Museum, Bequest of Maurice Sendak, 2013.103:69, 70, 71.
Maurice Sendak, 'Diorama of Moishe scrim and flower proscenium (Where the Wild Things Are),' 1979-1983, watercolor, pen and ink, and graphite pencil on laminated paperboard. © The Maurice Sendak Foundation. The Morgan Library & Museum, Bequest of Maurice Sendak, 2013.103:69, 70, 71.

September 30 - October 21

Brooks Outside: Evanescent

Come explore this immersive, outdoor light and sound experience inspired by the beauty, fragility, and transience of the natural world.

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June 24 – September 11, 2022

Another Dimension: Digital Art in Memphis

While digital art has existed since the 1960s, it has experienced increasingly mainstream interest in recent years. Due in part to our shift toward virtual environments during the Covid-19 pandemic, this rise in interest from artists to collectors has also been fueled by the growing popularity of cryptocurrencies and NFTs.

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Kenneth Wayne Alexander II, 'Tower of Babel', 2021. Digital video. Courtesy of the artist.
Kenneth Wayne Alexander II, 'Tower of Babel', 2021. Digital video. Courtesy of the artist.

June 10 - January 9, 2023

Monika Grzymala

Grzymala’s work challenges the very definition of drawing and the nature of categorizing artworks - where does drawing end and sculpture begin? What are drawings made from, and how do we experience them?

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Monika Grzymala, Line, London, 2016
Monika Grzymala, Line, London, 2016

March 15 - June 5

Paradise Lost: Albrecht Dürer's Stolen Eden

In the 1970s, a woodcut by one of the world's greatest printmakers, the German Renaissance artist Albrecht Dürer, was stolen from the Brooks. This print, the Expulsion of Adam and Eve, was part of a complete set of thirty-six illustrations and a title page known as the Small Passion.

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Albrecht Dürer, German, 1471 - 1528 'The Expulsion From Paradise' (detail), from the Small Passion (1511), ca. 1510, Woodcut, Museum purchase with funds provided by the Estate of W. H. Foote
Albrecht Dürer, German, 1471 - 1528 'The Expulsion From Paradise' (detail), from the Small Passion (1511), ca. 1510, Woodcut, Museum purchase with funds provided by the Estate of W. H. Foote

February 14 - Fall 2022

Faig Ahmed: Secret Garden

Faig Ahmed, the internationally celebrated artist from Azerbaijan, is known for transforming the visual language of traditional eastern carpets into contemporary, sculptural works of art.

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January 27 - May 7, 2023

Tommy Kha: Eye is Another

This site-specific, photography-based installation by artist Tommy Kha explores themes of identity, (in)visibility, and sense of place and is presented as part of the inaugural, state-wide Tennessee Triennial for Contemporary Art organized by Tristar Arts.

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Tommy Kha, 'Eye is Another', 2022-23, Inkjet prints on Photo Tex, dimensions variable
Tommy Kha, 'Eye is Another', 2022-23, Inkjet prints on Photo Tex, dimensions variable

March - June 2023

Harmonia Rosales: Master Narrative

Through her breathtaking and visceral paintings that weave the tales of West African Yorùbà religion, Greco-Roman mythology, and Christianity with artistic techniques of European Old Masters, Rosales rewrites the narrative from her perspective in a way that bridges the vastest of oceans and collapses the passing of millenia

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Harmonia Rosales, Migration of the Gods, 2021 Oil with iron oxide and 24 karat gold leaf on Belgian linen mounted on wood panel 36 × 72 in. Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Museum purchase, 2022.2
Harmonia Rosales, Migration of the Gods, 2021 Oil with iron oxide and 24 karat gold leaf on Belgian linen mounted on wood panel 36 × 72 in. Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Museum purchase, 2022.2

September 1, 2023 - January 7, 2024

Black American Portraits

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Amy Sherald, An Ocean Away, 2020, oil on canvas, 130 × 108 × 2 1/2 in., Los Angeles County Museum of Art, promised gift of Robert Iger and Willow Bay, © Amy Sherald, courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth, photo by Joseph Hyde
Amy Sherald, An Ocean Away, 2020, oil on canvas, 130 × 108 × 2 1/2 in., Los Angeles County Museum of Art, promised gift of Robert Iger and Willow Bay, © Amy Sherald, courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth, photo by Joseph Hyde

Photography Policy

Photography is permitted with no flash for personal and casual use. Flash is forbidden because it has the potential to damage artworks as well as it is distracting to other museum visitors. On occasions, photography restrictions do come up. Visitor Services will inform the public about such restrictions upon their arrival and appropriate signage will be posted at exhibition entrances. Video and tripods may not to be used in any museum gallery. Movie and video cameras also may not be used in the galleries.

Image Licensing / Permanent Collection

Works of art in the collection of Memphis Brook Museum of Art (the “Museum”), although owned by the Museum, may be protected by copyright, publication rights, or related interests that are not owned by the Museum. In supplying images, the Museum is not giving permission to exploit any third party rights. Individuals requesting images have the responsibility to obtain whatever rights or other permissions that may be required from an artist, his estate or any other third party rights holder.

  1. The museum charges licensing fees for high resolution images (tiffs or jpegs) that are provided with contractual guidelines. These fees help fund ongoing efforts to care for our collection.
  2. The Registrar’s Office will provide, free of charge, a low resolution digital image (jpeg) of a work of art in Memphis Brooks Museum’s ("the museum”) permanent collection, if it is available, for educational use or for scholarly or personal research, including a thesis, dissertation, or other school related paper. If you request a work in the museum’s collection that has not been photographed, photography may have to be arranged and this could involve a fee. Digital materials requested for research and educational purposes are not intended for publication, broadcast, or in any medium or for personal or commercial gain. Any unauthorized reproduction, distribution, or exploitation of this material is not permitted. All parties using this material will not infringe or violate the rights of any other party.
  3. The museum is committed to protecting the copyright and other protective rights of creative artists. Some artist’s copyrights may be administered by Visual Artists and Galleries Association, Inc. (VAGA) or Artists Rights Society (ARS).

Submitting Image Requests

Requests must include contact information (name, address, telephone, e-mail), and refer to image by artist/maker, title, and/or accession number. If it is to be published in any format, other information required: title and author of publication; format (book, web, journal, catalog, etc…); Print run and retail price; publication date; publishers name and address; number of languages; designate cover, full page, ¼ page, ½ page illustration; size of digital image required for project (pixels).

PLEASE FORWARD ALL IMAGING REQUESTS TO:

Registrar’s Office / Rights and Reproductions
Memphis Brooks Museum of Art
1934 Poplar Ave.
Memphis, TN 38104
Fax: 901-544-6276
E-mail: Collections@brooksmuseum.org

All requests are subject to review and approval. Costs vary and will be determined based upon intended use, available photography, and preferred delivery method. A quote will be sent outlining these costs, followed by a contract that specifies how the image(s) may be used in your project. Advanced payment required.

Please state whether the image will be used for research purposes or publication. Once a written request is received, an Application for Permission for Reproduction form along with an invoice for the appropriate fees will be sent. Reproduction fees vary, and requests for new photography incur additional fees. Upon receipt of signed form and payment, photographic material will be forwarded.The Brooks will provide reproductions of work protected by the artist’s copyright once permission is granted by either the artist, his or her estate, or the organization handling the artist’s copyright, including the Visual Artists and Galleries Association (VAGA) or the Artists Rights Society (ARS).

VAGA

350 Fifth Ave., Suite 6305 New York, NY 10118
Tel: 212.736.6666
Fax: 212.736.6767
E-mail: rpanzer@vagarights.com
Website: www.vaga.org

ARS

536 Broadway, 5th Floor New York, NY 10012
Tel: 212.420.9160
Fax: 212.420.9286
E-mail: info@arsny.com
Website: www.arsny.com


Appraisals

The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art is unable to appraise artworks. The museum recommends that an accredited appraiser be contacted directly. The following information is provided to aid in your search for an expert in a field related to your artwork. For assistance with finding an appraiser, please contact:

International Society of Appraisers
225 West Wacker Drive, Suite 650
Chicago, IL 60606
Phone: 312-981-6778
Fax: 312-265-2908
Email: usa@usa-appraisers.org
Website: isa-appraisers.org

Conservation

Stanford University's Preservation maintains links to numerous websites providing information regarding the care of artworks. Please click here for online conservation resources. For assistance in finding a conservator, please contact:

The American Institute for Conservation of Historic & Artistic Works
1156 15th St. NW Suite 320
Washington D.C. 20005-1714
Tel: 202.452.9545
Email: info@aic-faic.org
Website: conservation-us.org

Before choosing a conservator, we suggest you refer to the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Work brochure guidelines. This brochure can be accessed at conservation-us.org.

Additional Internet Resources:
What is a print?
The Art History Research Centre
Artnet Worldwide Corporation

MBMA Frames Assessment

Provenance

The provenance of a work of art is the history of the object’s ownership from the time of its creation to present day. Gaps in an object’s provenance highlight the need for further documentary evidence to clarify the history of ownership. In compliance with best-practice guidelines issued by the American Association of Museums in 1999 and 2001, the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art is committed to researching the provenance of the objects in our collection. While the provenance of many of these objects may never be fully resolved, the recent declassification of documents and the broad range of databases, catalogues, and images available on the Internet from libraries, museums, and research centers worldwide, make the chance for success greater than ever before.

Nazi-Era Research

Between 1933 and 1945, the Nazi Party systemically persecuted and stripped Jewish people from Nazi-occupied Europe of their possessions. These objects were looted, sold, dispersed, or destroyed. The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art began Nazi-Era provenance research in 2002, focusing on all European paintings in the permanent collection that transferred ownership or have gaps in their provenance from 1933 to 1945.

Although we cannot conclude that a work of art was looted or appropriated by the Nazis simply because it has incomplete or unverified information in its provenance, gaps in provenance do indicate that more robust research must be conducted. Many times, these gaps are the result of lost or destroyed gallery records or requested anonymity of a past owner. Several of the museum’s paintings have been researched and their provenance has been established, while others continue to be investigated.

The American Association of Museums has developed a Nazi-Era Provenance Internet Portal which provides a searchable registry of objects in United States museum collections that fit the criteria discussed above.

Colonial-Era Research

Throughout history, many works of art from around the world were stolen, forcibly sold, or taken without consent as the direct result of Colonialism. The communities whose objects were taken experienced trauma, violence, and loss. Looting is not just an issue of the past. These problems persist globally due to war, riot, shifts in government, organized crime, terrorism, and natural disasters and, unfortunately, looted objects emerge on the art market to this day. The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art is committed to not only investigating the history of objects in our collection with possible links to Colonialism, but also to ensuring that all incoming acquisitions and gifts have a verified past that align with our ethical obligations.

Click here to see a list of works from the Brooks Museum’s permanent collection that are currently undergoing research due to lapses in provenance. In allowing public access to this information, we join with the international art museum community in the diligent search for items seized or looted. Our records undergo continuous review, and we update them as new information is available.

If you have any inquiries or information about these items, please contact the museum.

DISCLAIMER

The Memphis Brooks Museum of Art does not recommend one appraiser, conservator, framer, or other art professional over another. This list includes suggestions of organizations that may be consulted, however, the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art will not be held responsible for any conservation or appraisals. This information is provided as a resource and is not an endorsement of any organization or individual.

Galleries

You can start your visit to the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art online and purchase your tickets before your arrive.

Plan your visit

Permanent Collections

Information about the permanent collections of the Brooks Museum

Interior with Soldiers
Provenance Research Paintings
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