Paradise Lost: Albrecht Dürer's Stolen EdenParadise Lost: Albrecht Dürer's Stolen Eden
Albrecht Dürer, German, 1471 - 1528 'The Expulsion From Paradise' (detail), from the Small Passion (1511), ca. 1510, Woodcut, Museum purchase with funds provided by the Estate of W. H. Foote

March 15 - June 5

Paradise Lost: Albrecht Dürer's Stolen Eden

In the 1970s, a woodcut by one of the world's greatest printmakers, the German Renaissance artist Albrecht Dürer, was stolen from the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. This print, the Expulsion of Adam and Eve, was part of a complete set of thirty-six illustrations and a title page known as the Small Passion. Originally printed as a book in Nuremberg in 1511, the series shows key Biblical scenes detailing the Fall and Redemption of man through Christ, from Adam and Eve to the Last Judgement. After much searching, in 2021 Brooks curator Dr. Rosamund Garrett discovered and won a replacement print of the Expulsion of Adam and Eve at auction.

This exhibition celebrates Dürer's unprecedented and arguably unsurpassed mastery of the woodcut technique, explores his place as one of the leading artistic figures of the European Renaissance, and marks the first time the Brooks Museum's Small Passion series has been shown in its entirety in almost fifty years. 

Exhibition Programs

No items found.

Artist

Curator

Artist + Curator

Albrecht Dürer

Albrecht Dürer

(b. Nuremberg, 1471- 1528)

View Artist's Website

Albrecht Dürer

(b. Nuremberg, 1471- 1528)

View Artist's Website
Chief Curator

Rosamund Garrett

Dr Rosamund Garrett is the Chief Curator at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Born in the United Kingdom, Rosamund gained her undergraduate at the University of Edinburgh and Edinburgh College of Art, before joining The Courtauld Institute of Art, London, for her MA (2011-12), and PhD (2012-2016). There she specialized in the art of Northern Europe in the Late Medieval and Renaissance period. Dr Garrett has worked in various museum positions in the UK including The National Trust and The Courtauld Gallery in London, working primarily with European Art and global contemporary art. In November 2018, Dr Garrett moved to Memphis. Here, she has worked on exhibitions including Power & Absence: Women in Europe, 1500 - 1680, Mona Hatoum: Misbah, and On Christopher Street: Transgender Portraits by Mark Seliger.

Rosamund Garrett

Chief Curator

Rosamund Garrett

Dr Rosamund Garrett is the Chief Curator at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Born in the United Kingdom, Rosamund gained her undergraduate at the University of Edinburgh and Edinburgh College of Art, before joining The Courtauld Institute of Art, London, for her MA (2011-12), and PhD (2012-2016). There she specialized in the art of Northern Europe in the Late Medieval and Renaissance period. Dr Garrett has worked in various museum positions in the UK including The National Trust and The Courtauld Gallery in London, working primarily with European Art and global contemporary art. In November 2018, Dr Garrett moved to Memphis. Here, she has worked on exhibitions including Power & Absence: Women in Europe, 1500 - 1680, Mona Hatoum: Misbah, and On Christopher Street: Transgender Portraits by Mark Seliger.

Program Recordings

No items found.

Resources

Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?

Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?

The American art theorist Linda Nochlin (1931-2017) posed this question as the title of a pioneering article in 1971. This essay was considered one of the first major works of Feminist art history, it has become a set text for those who study art internationally, and it is influential in many other fields.

Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists? by Linda Nochlin