Mid-South Scholastic Art Awards and Exhibition Mid-South Scholastic Art Awards and Exhibition
Adele Ferguson, 'Pax'

January 22 - February 20, 2022

Mid-South Scholastic Art Awards and Exhibition

The Mid-South Scholastic Art Awards began in 1965 as the Junior Mid-South Exhibition, a competition for area students sponsored by the Brooks Museum League and the museum. Since 1989, the Brooks has been proud to partner with the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, the national non-profit organization which organizes the nation’s oldest and largest student art competition, the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, to host the regional competition and exhibition for Memphis and the Mid-South area.  

Today’s Mid-South Scholastic Art Awards, staged and mounted at the Brooks Museum by League volunteers and the museum’s Education Department, is the most prestigious, competitive, and rewarding event of this type in the entire tri-state area. Each year, students in grades 7-12 submit more than 3,000 entries in a wide variety of categories, including painting, drawing, mixed media, photography, sculpture, graphic design, film, fashion, as well as senior art portfolios, which are reviewed by a panel of judges made up of regional artists, art educators, and other arts professionals.  

Regional winners are eligible for scholarships from five regional colleges and universities as well as cash prizes totaling more than $8,000. Gold key-winning artwork is included in an exhibition at the Brooks, and all students who receive gold keys, silver keys, and honorable mention awards are invited to participate in an awards ceremony at the museum.  Gold key-winning artwork goes on to compete on the national level for additional opportunities for recognition and scholarships.

Exhibition Programs

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Resources

Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?

Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?

The American art theorist Linda Nochlin (1931-2017) posed this question as the title of a pioneering article in 1971. This essay was considered one of the first major works of Feminist art history, it has become a set text for those who study art internationally, and it is influential in many other fields.

Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists? by Linda Nochlin