Andy Warhol's Little Red BookAndy Warhol's Little Red Book
(L) Andy Warhol, American, 1928 – 1987, Carroll Mallory, August 1972, Dye diffusion transfer print (Polaroid) 4 1/4 × 3 5/16 in. (10.8 × 8.4 cm), Gift of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., 2014.4s (R) Andy Warhol, American, 1928 – 1987, Claude Picasso, August, 1972, Dye diffusion transfer print (Polaroid) 4 1/4 × 3 5/16 in. (10.8 × 8.4 cm), Gift of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., 2014.4q

February 4 - May 15, 2022

Andy Warhol's Little Red Book

Andy Warhol (1928–87), a leading figure in the 1960s pop art movement, is best known today for his brightly colored silkscreen paintings of celebrities and soup cans. His work challenged preconceived notions about fine art, and in doing so blurred the lines between art and popular culture. In addition to his well-known paintings, Warhol produced a large body of photographic work–specifically, Polaroid snapshots.

Throughout the 1970s, Warhol documented his life using a Polaroid camera, taking spontaneous photographs of friends, celebrities, and associates. He also used Polaroid images as source material for his commissioned portraits, as the bright exposure of the Polaroid translated well into his signature high contrast style. Warhol produced more than 40,000 Polaroids between 1970 and 1987, a small portion of which he meticulously arranged into over 100 small red Holson Polaroid albums–the namesake for his Little Red Books.

This exhibition includes all twenty Polaroids from Warhol's Little Red Book #114, which were taken in July and August of 1972. The photographs, likely taken while Warhol was entertaining friends at his summer retreat in Montauk, include candid portraits of members of Warhol’s social circle such as model and food writer Maxime de la Falaise, model and actress Amina Warsuma, actress Betsy von Furstenberg, and Claude Picasso, among others. The decidedly unglamorous snapshots of everyday life contained in the Little Red Books demonstrate Warhol’s compulsive desire to capture, collect, and organize his world.

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Artist

Curator

Artist + Curator

Andy Warhol
Artist

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol changed the way we look at the world, and the way the world looks at art. With his exhaustive observation of cultural trends, from his rise to Pop art fame in the early 1960s up until his death in 1987, he identified the images and aesthetics shaping the consumer-driven postwar American experience, and transformed what he saw into a sophisticated yet accessible body of work. He invented new ways of image making, vastly expanding what was considered fine art, and also a new kind of artist, one who merged art and life, and treated painting, photography, filmmaking, writing, publishing, advertising, branding, performance, video, television, digital media—and even his own persona—as equally valid terrain for creative experimentation. Often lost in his own celebrity and myth is the fact that he is widely considered one of the most important postwar artists of the 20th century.

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Artist

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol changed the way we look at the world, and the way the world looks at art. With his exhaustive observation of cultural trends, from his rise to Pop art fame in the early 1960s up until his death in 1987, he identified the images and aesthetics shaping the consumer-driven postwar American experience, and transformed what he saw into a sophisticated yet accessible body of work. He invented new ways of image making, vastly expanding what was considered fine art, and also a new kind of artist, one who merged art and life, and treated painting, photography, filmmaking, writing, publishing, advertising, branding, performance, video, television, digital media—and even his own persona—as equally valid terrain for creative experimentation. Often lost in his own celebrity and myth is the fact that he is widely considered one of the most important postwar artists of the 20th century.

View Artist's Website
Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art

Dr. Patricia Dagle

Patricia Lee Daigle is Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. She came to the Brooks in December 2021 from the Dixon Gallery and Gardens where she served as Assistant Curator. Prior to this, Patricia was Director of The Martha and Robert Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art and Visiting Assistant Professor in Art History at The University of Memphis from 2015 to 2020. A specialist in twentieth-century American art with an emphasis on race and representation, she received her Ph.D. in the History of Art and Architecture from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and her B.A. in Art History and Anthropology from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Patricia has organized numerous highly regarded exhibitions including Jefferson Pinder: Thin Skin / Shock Layer (2019), Virginia Overton (2018), Umar Rashid (Frohawk Two Feathers): The Belhaven Republic (a delta blues), 1793-1795 (2017), and Rodrigo Valenzuela: Frontiers (2016) at The Martha and Robert Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art. From 2008-2014, Patricia worked as Curatorial Assistant in Contemporary Art at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, where she curated the exhibitions Living in the Timeless: Drawings by Beatrice Wood (2014) and Myth and Materiality: Latin American Art from the Permanent Collection,1930-1990 (2013) and contributed to several major exhibitions and publications including Labour and Wait (2013), Pasadena to Santa Barbara: A Selected History of Art in Southern California, 1951-1969 (2012), Charles Garabedian: A Retrospective (2011), and Yinka Shonibare, MBE: A Flying Machine for Every Man, Woman, and Child and Other Astonishing Works (2009).

Dr. Patricia Dagle

Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art

Dr. Patricia Dagle

Patricia Lee Daigle is Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. She came to the Brooks in December 2021 from the Dixon Gallery and Gardens where she served as Assistant Curator. Prior to this, Patricia was Director of The Martha and Robert Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art and Visiting Assistant Professor in Art History at The University of Memphis from 2015 to 2020. A specialist in twentieth-century American art with an emphasis on race and representation, she received her Ph.D. in the History of Art and Architecture from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and her B.A. in Art History and Anthropology from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Patricia has organized numerous highly regarded exhibitions including Jefferson Pinder: Thin Skin / Shock Layer (2019), Virginia Overton (2018), Umar Rashid (Frohawk Two Feathers): The Belhaven Republic (a delta blues), 1793-1795 (2017), and Rodrigo Valenzuela: Frontiers (2016) at The Martha and Robert Fogelman Galleries of Contemporary Art. From 2008-2014, Patricia worked as Curatorial Assistant in Contemporary Art at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, where she curated the exhibitions Living in the Timeless: Drawings by Beatrice Wood (2014) and Myth and Materiality: Latin American Art from the Permanent Collection,1930-1990 (2013) and contributed to several major exhibitions and publications including Labour and Wait (2013), Pasadena to Santa Barbara: A Selected History of Art in Southern California, 1951-1969 (2012), Charles Garabedian: A Retrospective (2011), and Yinka Shonibare, MBE: A Flying Machine for Every Man, Woman, and Child and Other Astonishing Works (2009).

Program Recordings

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Resources

Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?

Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?

The American art theorist Linda Nochlin (1931-2017) posed this question as the title of a pioneering article in 1971. This essay was considered one of the first major works of Feminist art history, it has become a set text for those who study art internationally, and it is influential in many other fields.

Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists? by Linda Nochlin