• Figure Drawing

    Jan 25th, 2017
    5:30pm - 7:30pm
    Free, or $5 donation to use museum supplies.

    Join artist and teacher Juan Rojo every other month to draw from a clothed model in museum galleries.

    Whether you’re an experienced artist or trying figure drawing for the first time, you’ll enjoy spending the evening drawing with others at the Brooks.

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  • Upstander Film Series: What Tomorrow Brings

    Jan 25th, 2017
    7:00pm - 8:30pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    In Afghanistan today, there is no social issue more controversial than women’s rights. And nothing cuts to the heart of the matter more than the education of young girls because nothing so radically threatens to change a deeply patriarchal society than rising generations of educated women.

    As recounted in What Tomorrow Brings, in 2009, when Razia Jan, a visionary and fearless educator, arrived in the war-blasted village of Deh’Subz to open the Zabuli Education Center, she placed herself at the center of her country’s turmoil. She faced families and village elders hostile to female education, threats (and nearby examples) of Taliban violence against schools for girls and the haunting question of what would happen when U.S. forces withdrew. To sustain herself, she had her own resourcefulness, the passion of her teachers and, perhaps most surprisingly in a conservative rural setting, the free-spirited determination of the girls themselves to get an education.

    The film is a powerful example of what happens when learning extends far beyond reading, writing and arithmetic. Here, girls have the space to dream of—and pursue—a life different from the one they were born into. One of the most striking features is the daily joy, curiosity and intellectual engagement of the girls in school—and the defiant or impish ruses they sometimes use to get there.“Nobody has the right to prevent girls from getting an education,” Razia tells her students. “If you were home you’d be washing clothes and sweeping. Your family would think of you like this flower. Theirs to protect or destroy. But this flower says, ‘Here I stand. Strong. Even if you try to destroy me I will bloom again and I will be beautiful.’”

    Director: Beth Murphy | USA | 2015 | 90 minutes

    Free.


    Facing History and Ourselves is proud to partner with the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in presenting the Upstander Film Series in January 2017. Every Wednesday night, the museum will show a film that celebrates stories of individuals that have embraced the challenge to speak out, stand up for others, and make decisions that help create positive change in our world. Following each screening, Facing History and Ourselves will facilitate a discussion with the audience and the creative minds behind the films.

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Jan 26th, 2017
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

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  • Contemporary Art Public Tour

    Jan 28th, 2017
    2:00pm - 3:00pm
    Included with museum admission/Free Brooks Membership.

    Join us for a docent led tour of contemporary art in the Brooks permanent collection.

    No reservation required; first come, first served; space is limited.


    Roger Brown, American, 1941-1997, Clouds Over Alabama, 1994, Oil on canvas, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art Purchase; funds provided by the Thomas W. Briggs Foundation Community Service Award in honor of Kaywin Feldman, with additional support from Mimi Loeb  2006.22. © The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the Brown Family

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  • Animated Film: The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie

    Jan 28th, 2017
    2:00pm - 3:40pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    A compilation of classic Looney Tunes shorts with bridge sequences hosted by Bugs Bunny, the animated Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie consists of more than two dozen cartoons including the masterpieces Duck Amuck, Ali Baba Bunny, What’s Opera, Doc? and Duck Dodgers in the 241/2 Century. Art and pop culture references abound, from Daffy Duck’s portrayal of Robin Hood in Robin Hood Daffy and the Batman outfit Wile E. Coyote wears in Gee Whiz-z-z-z-z-z-z to the “set” modeled after Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater house, which is used in the bridge sequences. Pratfalls, rivalries, battles and chases abound in this animated classic, which features Mel Blanc as the voice of dozens of Looney Tunes characters, including Bugs, Daffy, Porky Pig, Wile E. Coyote, and Road Runner, and music by Carl Stalling.

    The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie is presented in conjunction with Intrude, an exhibition on view outside the Brooks in late January 2017.

    Directors: Chuck Jones & Phil Monroe | USA | 1979 | 98 minutes

    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.


    About Brooks Outside: Intrude

    Intrude consists of five giant illuminated inflatable rabbits, the largest of which is approximately 23 feet high, 10 feet wide and 16 feet long. Created by Australian artist Amanda Parer (b. 1971), this installation first appeared at Vivid Festival of Light in Sydney and has traveled to the United States, United Kingdom, France, Canada, Scotland, Denmark, Italy, and Belgium.

    On view at the Brooks January 18 – 22 and 25 – 29, Intrude explores the natural world, its fragility, and our role within it. Rabbits in Parer’s native Australia are out of control pests, leaving a trail of ecological destruction wherever they go and defying attempts at eradication. First introduced by white settlers in 1788 they have caused a great imbalance to the country’s endemic species.

    The rabbit also is an animal of contradiction. It represents the fairytale animal from our childhood—a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields. Intrude deliberately evokes this image, and a strong visual humor, to lure you into the artwork only to reveal the more serious environmental messages behind it.

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  • Classic Film: Monty Python and the Holy Grail

    Jan 29th, 2017
    2:00pm - 3:30pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Recognized as one of the greatest comedy films of all time, this 1974 parody of the sixth century quest to find the Holy Grail stars Monty Python regulars Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, and Michael Palin as King Arthur, Sir Lancelot, Patsy, Sir Robin, Sir Belvedere, and Sir Galahad. Hilariously low budget, the slapstick comedy employs sound-effect coconuts to emulate thundering horses’ hooves, and features a real “Killer Rabbit” which battles the knights. 

    The Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog, or the Legendary Black Beast of Aaaaarrrrrrggghhh, named for the final utterance of anyone who ever saw it, faces off against King Arthur and his knights in a major battle. According to Monty Python lore, the idea for the scene was taken from an illustration on the façade of Notre Dame de Paris, which illustrates the weakness of cowardice by depicting a knight fleeing from a rabbit. In another pivotal scene in the film, the Knights of the Round Table attempt to breech a French castle via a Trojan Rabbit, yet they forget to hide inside before it’s brought inside the castle keep.

    Monty Python and the Holy Grail is presented in conjunction with Intrude, an exhibition on view outside the Brooks in late January 2017.

    Directors: Terry Gilliam & Terry Jones | UK | 1974 | 91 minutes

    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.


    About Brooks Outside: Intrude

    Intrude consists of five giant illuminated inflatable rabbits, the largest of which is approximately 23 feet high, 10 feet wide and 16 feet long. Created by Australian artist Amanda Parer (b. 1971), this installation first appeared at Vivid Festival of Light in Sydney and has traveled to the United States, United Kingdom, France, Canada, Scotland, Denmark, Italy, and Belgium.

    On view at the Brooks January 18 – 22 and 25 – 29, Intrude explores the natural world, its fragility, and our role within it. Rabbits in Parer’s native Australia are out of control pests, leaving a trail of ecological destruction wherever they go and defying attempts at eradication. First introduced by white settlers in 1788 they have caused a great imbalance to the country’s endemic species.

    The rabbit also is an animal of contradiction. It represents the fairytale animal from our childhood—a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields. Intrude deliberately evokes this image, and a strong visual humor, to lure you into the artwork only to reveal the more serious environmental messages behind it.

    More Details