• Yoga Thursdays

    Jun 2nd, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

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  • Brooks Uncorked

    Mar 31st, 2017
    7:00pm - 10:00pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

    Our 25th anniversary of the wine series kicks off with a Disco Ball at the Brooks!

    The first 100 guests will receive special giveaways you won't want to miss.

    General Admission: $100 before March 20; $125 thereafter

    Tickets


    Featured wines from:

    Meet the winemakers from:
    Robert Turner Wines
    Somerston Estate
    Terra Valentine

     

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  • Documentary Film: Kallen Esperian: Visse D’arte

    Apr 5th, 2017
    7:00pm - 8:10pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid id/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Join filmmaker Steve Ross, lyric soprano Kallen Esperian and her accompanist Gary Beard for this special screening of Vissi D’arte. All three will take part in a Q&A after the film.

    Kallen Esperian was just in her twenties when she performed some of the most famous roles in opera, appearing opposite Pavarotti, Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras at world-renowned venues such as La Scala and the Met. She also endeared herself to the citizens of Memphis, where she moved in 1984, appearing at benefits, singing at local churches, and headlining productions at Opera Memphis. Yet soon after her triumphant appearance in Madame Butterfly, Esperian’s life began to unravel. Health problems, a divorce and an automobile accident caused severe personal and fiscal setbacks. Her confidence shattered, Esperian’s career ground to a halt.

    Steve Ross, an award-winning filmmaker and Professor of Film at the University of Memphis, met Esperian near the end of that dark period, and witnessed her determination to get her life and her career back on track. He approached Esperian with the idea of making a documentary film chronicling the process, and for the next year, she gave him access to her life. The breathtaking final result was the closing night film at the 2016 Indie Memphis Film Festival. It’s also been screened at the University Film and Video Association Annual Conference in Las Vegas, and has been recently selected for screening at the 2017 American Documentary Film Festival in Palm Springs.

    Ross’ previous work includes Winslow Homer:  Society and Solitude; Oh Freedom After While, narrated by Julian Bond; Black Diamonds, Blues City, Stories of The Memphis Red Sox, narrated by Samuel L. Jackson; and adaptations of two stories by Pulitzer Prize-winning authors: The Old Forest by Peter Taylor and A Game of Catch by Richard Wilbur. Ross is one of the three directors of the acclaimed Civil Rights Era documentary At The River I Stand. He has had a Southern Arts Federation (South Arts) residency at The American Academy in Rome, and a residency at Yaddo in Saratoga Springs.  He is a past national president of the University Film and Video Association, and has received the highest academic honors the University of Memphis bestows on its faculty.  He has also taught at Wesleyan University, Temple University, and Sacred Heart University.

    Director: Steve Ross | USA | 2016 | 61 minutes

    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid id/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Apr 6th, 2017
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Matt Thompson: Building a World Class Zoo

    Apr 7th, 2017
    10:30am - 11:30am
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    A Brooks Museum League Event

    Matt Thompson is Director of Animal Programs at the Memphis Zoo and has been with the zoo for 13 years.

    He will talk about how the zoo has transformed over the last 110 years to become the modern zoo that it is. Thompson's talk will include Memphis Zoo history, discussion about modern animal husbandry and exhibitory and what the future holds
    for the zoo and Overton Park.

     

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  • National Black Box Performing Arts Festival: I Am Not Your Negro

    Apr 7th, 2017
    7:00pm - 8:35pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

    Haitian director Raoul Peck envisions Remember This House, James Baldwin’s unfinished manuscript on the lives and assassinations of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Baldwin’s radical narration about race in America brings a fresh perspective to current issues via Peck’s elegantly precise—and Academy Award-nominated—film essay, which examines the unholy agglomeration of myths, institutionalized practices both legal and illegal, and displaced white terror that have long perpetuated our nation’s history.

    Writes New York Times film critic A.O. Scott, “To call I Am Not Your Negro a movie about James Baldwin would be to understate Peck’s achievement. It’s more of a posthumous collaboration, an uncanny and thrilling communion between the filmmaker and his subject. Baldwin could not have known about Ferguson and Black Lives Matter, about the presidency of Barack Obama and the recrudescence of white nationalism in its wake, but in a sense he explained it all in advance. He understood the deep, contradictory patterns of our history, and articulated, with a passion and clarity that few others have matched, the psychological dimensions of racial conflict: the suppression of black humanity under slavery and Jim Crow and the insistence on it in African American politics and art; the dialectic of guilt and rage, forgiveness and denial that distorts relations between black and white citizens in the North as well as the South; the lengths that white people will go to wash themselves clean of their complicity in oppression.

    I Am Not Your Negro is presented at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art as part of the National Black Box Performing Arts Festival, held in Memphis April 6 - 9. A three-day event promoting cultural equity by showcasing the works of African American and Latino artists, the festival highlights artistically excellent works of emerging, underexposed, and underappreciated playwrights, dancers, filmmakers, spoken word artists, and vocal groups. It is an intentional effort to display art forms that transcend entertainment, highlight the human condition in ways that spark conversation, support social justice movements, and give voice to marginalized people.

    Director: Raoul Peck | USA/France/Belgium/Switzerland | 2016 | 93 minutes

    Friday, April 7 | 7 pm

    Saturday, April 8 | 2 & 7 pm

    Sunday, April 9 | 3 pm

    Tickets

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  • National Black Box Performing Arts Festival: I Am Not Your Negro

    Apr 8th, 2017
    2:00pm - 3:35pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

    Haitian director Raoul Peck envisions Remember This House, James Baldwin’s unfinished manuscript on the lives and assassinations of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Baldwin’s radical narration about race in America brings a fresh perspective to current issues via Peck’s elegantly precise—and Academy Award-nominated—film essay, which examines the unholy agglomeration of myths, institutionalized practices both legal and illegal, and displaced white terror that have long perpetuated our nation’s history.

    Writes New York Times film critic A.O. Scott, “To call I Am Not Your Negro a movie about James Baldwin would be to understate Peck’s achievement. It’s more of a posthumous collaboration, an uncanny and thrilling communion between the filmmaker and his subject. Baldwin could not have known about Ferguson and Black Lives Matter, about the presidency of Barack Obama and the recrudescence of white nationalism in its wake, but in a sense he explained it all in advance. He understood the deep, contradictory patterns of our history, and articulated, with a passion and clarity that few others have matched, the psychological dimensions of racial conflict: the suppression of black humanity under slavery and Jim Crow and the insistence on it in African American politics and art; the dialectic of guilt and rage, forgiveness and denial that distorts relations between black and white citizens in the North as well as the South; the lengths that white people will go to wash themselves clean of their complicity in oppression.

    I Am Not Your Negro is presented at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art as part of the National Black Box Performing Arts Festival, held in Memphis April 6 - 9. A three-day event promoting cultural equity by showcasing the works of African American and Latino artists, the festival highlights artistically excellent works of emerging, underexposed, and underappreciated playwrights, dancers, filmmakers, spoken word artists, and vocal groups. It is an intentional effort to display art forms that transcend entertainment, highlight the human condition in ways that spark conversation, support social justice movements, and give voice to marginalized people.

    Director: Raoul Peck | USA/France/Belgium/Switzerland | 2016 | 93 minutes

    Friday, April 7 | 7 pm

    Saturday, April 8 | 2 & 7 pm

    Sunday, April 9 | 3 pm

    Tickets

    More Details
  • National Black Box Performing Arts Festival: I Am Not Your Negro

    Apr 9th, 2017
    3:00pm - 4:35pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

    Haitian director Raoul Peck envisions Remember This House, James Baldwin’s unfinished manuscript on the lives and assassinations of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Baldwin’s radical narration about race in America brings a fresh perspective to current issues via Peck’s elegantly precise—and Academy Award-nominated—film essay, which examines the unholy agglomeration of myths, institutionalized practices both legal and illegal, and displaced white terror that have long perpetuated our nation’s history.

    Writes New York Times film critic A.O. Scott, “To call I Am Not Your Negro a movie about James Baldwin would be to understate Peck’s achievement. It’s more of a posthumous collaboration, an uncanny and thrilling communion between the filmmaker and his subject. Baldwin could not have known about Ferguson and Black Lives Matter, about the presidency of Barack Obama and the recrudescence of white nationalism in its wake, but in a sense he explained it all in advance. He understood the deep, contradictory patterns of our history, and articulated, with a passion and clarity that few others have matched, the psychological dimensions of racial conflict: the suppression of black humanity under slavery and Jim Crow and the insistence on it in African American politics and art; the dialectic of guilt and rage, forgiveness and denial that distorts relations between black and white citizens in the North as well as the South; the lengths that white people will go to wash themselves clean of their complicity in oppression.

    I Am Not Your Negro is presented at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art as part of the National Black Box Performing Arts Festival, held in Memphis April 6 - 9. A three-day event promoting cultural equity by showcasing the works of African American and Latino artists, the festival highlights artistically excellent works of emerging, underexposed, and underappreciated playwrights, dancers, filmmakers, spoken word artists, and vocal groups. It is an intentional effort to display art forms that transcend entertainment, highlight the human condition in ways that spark conversation, support social justice movements, and give voice to marginalized people.

    Director: Raoul Peck | USA/France/Belgium/Switzerland | 2016 | 93 minutes

    Friday, April 7 | 7 pm

    Saturday, April 8 | 2 & 7 pm

    Sunday, April 9 | 3 pm

    Tickets

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  • Tour: Depictions of Christ

    Apr 12th, 2017
    6:00pm - 7:00pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    Preceding the screening of King of Kings, the Reverend Dr. Stephen R. Montgomery, Pastor at Idlewild Presbyterian Church, will host an informal tour of depictions of the Christ figure in the museum’s permanent collection.

    Join us for a gallery discussion chronicling examples of western religious imagery across a vast range of time periods and artistic styles.

    No reservation required; tour will accommodate first 30 guests to arrive.

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  • Banned in Memphis: King of Kings

    Apr 12th, 2017
    7:00pm - 9:00pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid id/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    In 1928, Lloyd Binford, chairman of the Memphis Board of Censors, banned Cecil B. DeMille’s silent epic King of Kings from playing within the city limits. According to the Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture,   Binford followed local Jewish leaders who objected to the film on the grounds that it was anti-Semitic. Other sources cite Binford’s opinion that the story of Jesus deviated from text in the New Testament, while still others state that he deemed the crucifixion scenes too violent.

    In her book Battling the Plantation Mentality: Memphis and the Black Freedom Struggle, author Laurie Beth Green writes that Binford declared that King of Kings was “one of the worst travesties of the Bible [he had] ever seen!” In Mayor Crump Don’t Like It: Machine Politics in Memphis, author and historian Wayne Dowdy takes that quote a step further, citing Binford as stating that several scenes were “a perversion of the true life of Christ.”

    A lawsuit filed in circuit court ruled in favor of the Lyric Theater, which was slated to run of King of Kings at 291 Madison Avenue in March 1928. Powers-that-be at the Lyric refused to delete several scenes, as ordered by Binford. Judge A.B. Pittman ruled in the theater’s favor, but city attorney Walter Chandler appealed. Ultimately, the Tennessee Supreme Court refused to hear the case, and King of Kings was not screened in Memphis.

    On to the film: King of Kings, the second in DeMille’s Bible trilogy, stars H.B. Warner as Jesus and Jacqueline Logan as Mary Magdalene, depicted here as a wild courtesan. Author and philosopher Ayn Rand appears as an extra. According to the New Yorker, “on the set, Rand persuaded a costume director to promote her from a crowd of beggars to a crowd of patricians.”

    King of Kings is the "Greatest Story Ever Told" as only DeMille could tell it. Working with one of the biggest budgets in Hollywood history, he spun the life and Passion of Christ into a silent-era blockbuster. Featuring text drawn directly from the Bible, a cast of thousands, and the great showman’s singular cinematic bag of tricks, King of Kings is at once spectacular and deeply reverent—part Gospel, part Technicolor epic.

    John Beifuss, journalist, film critic and columnist at the Commercial Appeal, and the Reverend Dr. Stephen R. Montgomery, Pastor at Idlewild Presbyterian Church, will introduce the screening. After the film, Beifuss and Montgomery will lead a brief discussion about Lloyd Binford’s censorship, the popularity of big-screen Biblical epics and the Americanization of religious icons.

    Director: Cecil B. DeMille | USA | 1928 | 112 minutes

    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid id/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.


    Related Events:

    Tour: Depictions of Christ

    Wednesday, April 12 | 6 pm

    Preceding the screening, the Reverend Dr. Stephen R. Montgomery, Pastor at Idlewild Presbyterian Church, will host an informal tour of depictions of the Christ figure in the museum’s permanent collection. Join us for a gallery discussion chronicling examples of western religious imagery across a vast range of time periods and artistic styles. No reservation required; tour will accommodate first 30 guests to arrive.


    Banned in Memphis is a series of film screenings highlighting work banned from screening in Memphis theaters by Lloyd Binford, the head of the Memphis Censor Board for 28 years. Regarded as “the toughest critic in America,” the former railway clerk turned insurance executive was notorious for his views on white supremacy, womanhood, and outsider views of the American South. Binford banned films with African American stars or unsegregated scenes, films that featured violence or teenage rebellion, and even film that he disliked because of the personal conduct of the actors rather than the content of the script.

    Other screenings in the series include:

    The Wild One, introduced by author and historian Wayne Dowdy.

    Wednesday, May 17 | 7 pm

    Cabin in the Sky, introduced by writer, filmmaker and producer Willy Bearden.

    Wednesday, June 21 | 7 pm

    The Outlaw, introduced by author and archivist Vincent Astor.

    Wednesday, July 12 | 7 pm

    Stromboli, introduced by author and columnist Richard Alley.

    Wednesday, August 23 | 7 pm

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Apr 13th, 2017
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Performance: Don Lifted

    Apr 19th, 2017
    8:00pm - 9:30pm
    $5 per person.

    Visual artist and alt hip hop artist Lawrence "Don Lifted" Matthews will transform the Brooks’ Dorothy K. Hohenberg Auditorium with music from his album Alero and his December LP series as well as new music from a yet-unnamed project. Lawrence will perform with Ben Callicott on guitar, accompanied by a video and 3D installation to bring the audience an immersive artistic experience. Lawrence will also be giving away limited copies of the Alero visual narrative booklet which features photography and lyrics as well as the album itself to students with a college ID.
     
    Matthews is a multi-disciplined fixture in the Memphis art scene, predominantly working in music, visual arts and film. He started production on his new album Alero in Memphis in late 2014 and finished the project in Hollywood with a mastering session by Grammy Award-winning engineer Mike Bozzi (Good Kid, Maad City, To Pimp A Butterfly and Blankface). Matthews’ style incorporates hip hop, alternative rock and electronic music, resulting in emotionally vulnerable storytelling and eclectic production. His art installation Florence and Normandie is on view at the National Civil Rights Museum through April 29.
     
    Auditorium doors open at 7 pm.
    Performance begins at 8 pm sharp.
     
    $5.

    Tickets

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Apr 20th, 2017
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Past Present: A Lecture by Susan Sully

    Apr 22nd, 2017
    10:30am - 11:30am
    Included with museum admission/Free Brooks Membership.

    A Decorative Arts Trust Event

    Heirlooms and antiques have the power to weave the past with the present in a way that newly manufactured things simply cannot imitate. After experiencing her own reckoning with an inherited collection of treasures and countless oddments, author Susan Sully sought the advice of dozens of professionals and distilled the best of it into a beautifully illustrated and practical guide.

    She will draw from that in her lecture Past Present, Living with Heirlooms and Antiques. Susan Sully is the author of many books about architecture and interior design.

    She last spoke to Decorative Arts Trust following publication of her book The Southern Cosmopolitan.

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