• Cult Film: Little Fugitive

    Dec 7th, 2016
    7:00pm - 8:30pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    This landmark film directly influenced the French New Wave via its naturalistic style and the groundbreaking use of nonprofessional actors in leading roles. Nominated for an Academy Award in the category of Best Writing, Little Fugitive was also awarded the prestigious Silver Lion at the 1953 Venice Film Festival. In 1997, it was selected for preservation in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry.

    Filmed on location at Coney Island and in Brooklyn, New York, Little Fugitive resembles a Red Grooms painting come to life. In the film, seven-year-old Joey Norton runs away from home after mistakenly thinking he has shot and killed his older brother. Frightened with threats of imprisonment, Joey flees to Coney Island, where he enjoys pony rides and the arcades before spending the night under the boardwalk. Upon its release in 1953, the New York Times described it as “a candid study of a Brooklyn kid… a wondrous illustration of the eccentricities of a small boy, adrift on his own resources in a tiny and tawdry mob playground.”

    Little Fugitive features incredible camera work by Morris Engel, who used a concealed strap-on camera, a prototype for the Steadicam, to capture thousands of beach-going New Yorkers as unwitting extras. As François Truffaut said, “Our New Wave would never have come into being if it hadn’t been for the young American, Morris Engel, who showed us the way with Little Fugitive.”

    Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Red Grooms: Traveling Correspondent, on view though January 8.

    Directors: Ray Ashley, Morris Engel & Ruth Orkin | USA | 1953 | 80 minutes

    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Dec 8th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

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  • Foreign Film: Blancanieves

    Dec 9th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:30pm
    $5/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Spanish filmmaker Pablo Berger transports the opulent fantasy of Snow White to circa-1920s Andalusia in his homage to both the Brothers Grimm and silent cinema. In Berger’s breathtaking rendition of the all-t0o-familiar fairy tale, Snow White’s father is a famous matador; the cruel stepmother is his nurse; and the seven dwarves are a troupe of diminutive bullfighters known as Los Enanitos Toreros.

    In one of his final reviews, the late film critic Roger Ebert wrote of Blancanieves,Although the story draws on the Brothers Grimm and the legend of Snow White, it is anything but a children's movie. It is a full-bodied silent film of the sort that might have been made by the greatest directors of the 1920s, if such details as the kinky sadomasochism of this film's evil stepmother could have been slipped past the censors.”

    Director: Pablo Berger | Spain | 2012 | 90 minutes

    $5/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Please note that no advance tickets will be sold for our Friday matinee screenings.

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  • Documentary Film: The Silence of Mark Rothko

    Dec 11th, 2016
    2:00pm - 3:00pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    "He wanted the viewer to step into the painting. What he aimed for was not a consumption of art, but a dialogue. He thought that art could transform the public."

    —Annie Cohen-Solal, Mark Rothko biographer

    Painter Mark Rothko is best known for imposing canvasses that eschew representation in favor of pure color and texture—using them to express fundamental human emotions. In The Silence Of Mark Rothko, we visit Rothko's studio at 22 Bowery in New York, and go to Florence's Museo di san Marco, where the monastic work of Renaissance painter Fra Angelico deeply influenced Rothko's mission to create environments and not just paintings. In The Hague, filmmaker Marjoleine Boonstra introduces us to curator Franz Kaiser of the Gemeentemuseum, as his team installs the works for the first major Rothko exhibit to be held in Holland in 40 years.

    The film includes thoughtful, engaging commentary from experts including Rothko's biographer, Annie Cohen-Solal, and conservator Carol Mancusi-Ungaro (who speculates on whether splotches of paint on the studio floor may have been Rothko's). Fittingly though, for a film about a painter whose greatest works evoke both silence and emotion, The Silence Of Mark Rothko lingers on paintings and locations—using architectural shots, interiors and streetscapes to link Rothko's work to the world he inhabited.

    Featuring works from his early mythological period, his classic color field paintings, his later “Black on Grey” pieces, and the Rothko Chapel in Houston, the film is a unique artistic biography that provides a heightened level of intimacy and familiarity with its subject's work through carefully chosen visuals and interviews. Interspersed throughout are readings from the painter's writings by his son, Christopher—passages that illuminate and bring immediacy to Rothko's work and philosophy.

    Director: Marjoleine Boonstra | Netherlands | 2016 | 52 minutes

    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.

    More Details