• Cocktails with the Curator

    Aug 31st, 2016
    5:30pm - 7:30pm
    Fellow-level ($300) members and above.

    This event is now full!

    Sip cocktails, mingle with other Brooks members, and enjoy a curator-led tour of Veda Reed: Day into Night. The tour begins at 6:15 pm.

    Fellow-level ($300) members and above.

    Love the Brooks and not yet a member? Join or upgrade your membership online or call 901.544.6230.

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  • Documentary Film: Don’t Blink – Robert Frank

    Aug 31st, 2016
    7:00pm - 8:25pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Director: Laura Israel | USA| 2015 | 82 minutes

    Don’t Blink is a biography of the 91-year old American photographer and documentary filmmaker Robert Frank, who is most known for his 1958 book titled The Americans. Director Laura Israel gained incredible access to Frank’s life, art, and clips from his rarely seen films.

    Nick Schager at Variety Magazine writes that Don’t Blink “refers to its subject’s persistent dedication to capturing life in all its unkempt, impromptu glory. It also, however, seems to allude to the sheer pace of Israel’s documentary, which employs an unconventional editorial style involving rapid-fire collages of Frank’s still photos, his later avant-garde movies, and recent footage of the artist (as well as of friends, colleagues, and his wife, June Leaf). It’s a unique, associative blend of sounds and images that aims to convey details as well as underlying truths about Frank’s life.”

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Sep 1st, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

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  • WLOK Black Film Festival: Comedy: School Daze

    Sep 2nd, 2016
    3:00pm - 5:00pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    Director: Spike Lee | USA | 1988 | 121 minutes

    Legendary African-American director Spike Lee’s third film School Daze is a musical comedy about Greek life at a fictitious historically black college called Mission College whose hilarious motto is “Uplift Race.” At Mission College there is a huge schism between Greeks and “Independents” and social activists and bookworms. Many sorority girls at this college straighten their hair, wear blue contacts, and are light skinned. This leads to a catty rivalry with the girls who wear their hair in its natural Afro glory and are Independents.

    Film critic Roger Ebert comments that School Daze “confronts a lot of issues that aren’t talked about in the movies these days: not only issues of skin color and hair, but also the emergence of a black class, the purpose of all-black universities in an integrated society, and the sometimes sexist treatment of black women by black men.”

    The leading character Dap, a political activist and intellectual, wants Mission College to divest itself from South African business arrangements and is met with anger from the school administration for his radical beliefs.

    As Janet Maslin writes in the New York Times, “The bravest parts of ''School Daze'' are those that pinpoint the uneasiness at its heart. When Dap and his friends go to a downtown fast-food restaurant and have an unfriendly encounter with a group of locals, for instance, they're face to face with an uncomfortable truth: the downtown blacks don't see them as apartheid-fighting crusaders, only as privileged college boys.”

    This film displays racial and also socio-economical inequality within the confines of a Greek life-obsessed college campus.

    WLOK Black Film Festival in Partnership with the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

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  • WLOK Black Film Festival: Documentary Film: Wattstax

    Sep 2nd, 2016
    7:00pm - 8:45pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    Director: Mel Stuart | USA | 1973 | 103 minutes

    Wattstax was an immensely successful benefit concert in Los Angeles, California, put on and sponsored by Stax Records in Memphis, TN. Organized to benefit the community of Watts, after the riots of 1965, the concert was held at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum on August 20, 1972. Wattstax featured prominent Stax artists such as Isaac Hayes, the Bar-Kays, the Staples Singers, Carla Thomas and many more. Tickets prices for this concert were $1 so that people from all walks of life and backgrounds could come to this concert to unite in support of Watts.

    The film Wattstax was made during the concert and nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Documentary. It portrays many hiccups and speed bumps in the concert’s conception, such as the stage for the show being built in the middle of the night the night before, but miraculously it all worked out to give the world Wattstax in all its glory.

    Keith Phipps at the A.V. Club calls Wattstax “a rare collision of '60s community spirit, Nixon-era paranoia, and the eternal cool of a Memphis legend who cut hits for Sun Records while Elvis was still driving trucks.”

    WLOK Black Film Festival in Partnership with the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

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  • WLOK Black Film Festival: Comedy: Life

    Sep 3rd, 2016
    11:00am - 1:50pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    Director: Ted Demme | USA | 1999 | 108 minutes

    This comedy starring Eddie Murphy and Martin Lawrence is about two men named Ray and Claude from New York City in 1934 who are wrongly convicted of a murder and are sentenced to life imprisonment. Ray and Claude could not be more different, for Ray is a petty thief and Claude is a bank teller. These two men’s paths cross at a club in New York City where Ray attempts to rob Claude, which leads to a giant misunderstanding and a trip to Mississippi in which they are framed for murder. They are sent to a prison the Mississippi Federal Penitentiary, a prison camp called “Camp 8” to do hard labor for the rest of their lives. For the next 65 years these men attempt to escape from prison and constantly are at the wrong place at the wrong time.

    Film critic Roger Ebert describes Life as a “sentimental comedy with a backdrop of racism.” The New York Times writes that actors Eddie Murphy and Martin Lawrence, “make an entertaining team. And they are surrounded by a supporting cast that makes the prison setting more pleasant than it has any right to be. While the place seems to grow so cushy that it's only a matter of time before the inmates take up golf."

    Life approaches the problems of racism and prison time in a lighthearted manner that is funny and enjoyable.

    WLOK Black Film Festival in Partnership with the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

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  • WLOK Black Film Festival: Drama: Imitation of Life

    Sep 4th, 2016
    3:00pm - 5:05pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    Directors: Douglas Sirk | 1959 | USA | 125 minutes

    Imitation of Life is the Douglas Sirk remake of the original 1934 version based on Fannie Hurst’s novel of the same name. This film is set in 1940s-50s America and tells the story of a white widowed mother named Lora, played by Lana Turner, who is also a struggling actress, and the black family that eventually move in with her. One day Lora loses track of her daughter Susie and she comes to meet a black mother named Annie, played by Juanita Moore, and her daughter Sarah Jane who have found Susie and are looking after her. The black mother and daughter move in with the white mother and daughter and Annie becomes Lora’s maid and nanny.

    Sarah Jane, Annie’s daughter, is light skinned and can pass for white and chooses to do so for all the opportunities she can gain as a “white” girl in America. This breaks her mother’s heart and creates a riff between the two women. As Sarah Jane lets go of her heritage and lives a lie as a white girl, Lora neglects her own daughter Susie to pursue an acting career. The dynamics between the white family and black family contrast each other as Annie watches over the two girls and always remains loyal, while Lora leaves behind these women for her own selfish desires and love interests.

    As Bosley Crowther writes in the New York Times, “The contrast of the mother's compensations from their differing daughters is the story's irony.” This film highlights the racial inequality in America in the 50’s and in 2015 it was added into the National Film Registry for its cultural and historical prevalence.

    WLOK Black Film Festival in Partnership with the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

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  • 30 Days of Opera: "Un Ballo in Maschera"

    Sep 7th, 2016
    6:30pm - 8:30pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    Director: Yinka Shonibare MBE | UK | 2004 | 32 minutes

    Artist Yinka Shonibare MBE explores the idea of film as a “moving tableau” or animated painting with luminous surfaces, sumptuous attention to detail and strong compositional effects. Un Ballo in Maschera, his first film, takes its title from Giuseppe Verdi’s 1859 opera, which was inspired by the assassination of Swedish king Gustav III at a masked ball in Stockholm in 1792. An elaborate costume drama featuring performers in Dutch wax ball gowns, frock coats and ornate Venetian-style masks, Shonibare’s film is rife with themes of aristocracy, play, frivolity and excess.

    Shonibare has spoken about his interest in narrative structure, citing French New Wave directors Jean-Luc Godard and Alain Resnais as inspirational. Un Ballo in Maschera extends this interest, using a circular—not linear—approach to time. After the king is shot, he rises and dances once again, the event playing backwards and forwards with minute variations as the actors re-perform the event for the camera.

    The film will be introduced by Opera Memphis staff, and following the screening, Opera Memphis will perform in the museum rotunda, amongst the four figures from Shonibare’s series Rage of the Ballet Gods, a contemplation of climate change through the symbolism of Greek mythology. The inaugural exhibition for the Brooks’ Rotunda Projects, Shonibare’s work will be on view through November 6.

    This event is part of Opera Memphis’ annual 30 Days of Opera initiative to introduce opera into the everyday routines of local residents—at farmers markets, restaurants, schools, and street corners. Over the course of 30 consecutive days, Opera Memphis presents “pop-up” recitals, master classes, children’s operas, and more, reaching over 50,000 people during the month-long extravaganza.


    Photo © Royal Academy of Arts, London; photographer Marcus Leith

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Sep 8th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

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  • Documentary Film: The Seasons in Quincy: Four Portraits of John Berger

    Sep 10th, 2016
    2:00pm - 3:30pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Directors: Bartek Dziadosz, Colin MacCabe, Christopher Roth, Tilda Swinton | UK| 2016 | 90 minutes

    This documentary about esteemed writer, art critic and painter John Berger is comprised of four parts, each directed by a different person and their relationship with the subject. Filmed in the gorgeous French Alps over a five-year period and focusing on a small town in France called Quincy, The Seasons in Quincy deals with relationships, family, nature, and politics.

    Andrew Pulver at the Guardian writes, “Quincy comprises four films about Berger: one directed by Swinton, another by Derek producer Colin MacCabe, and the other two by Christopher Roth and Bartek Dziadosz. It’s fair to say, however, there are no strict boundaries: people cross over and pop up in their collaborators’ films, filling different roles as the need arises. But the focus, of course, is Berger—still, in his 80s, a figure of considerable charisma and clearly held in high esteem and affection by all involved.”

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.

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  • Artist@Work: Jonathan May

    Start: Sep 14, 2016
    10:00am
    End: Sep 28, 2016
    8:00pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    Residencies bring writers, poets, playwrights, and other creative professionals to the museum galleries, where they work on projects in public view. Our inaugural Artist@Work resident, poet Jonathan May, will be at the Brooks the last two weeks of September. Check our website or ask at Visitor Services to see if he’s present in the galleries during your next visit to the museum.

    Jonathan May grew up in Zimbabwe as the child of missionaries. A queer writer, he lives and teaches in Memphis, where he uses poetry therapy to help people with eating disorders. His work has appeared in [PANK]Superstition ReviewDuendeOne, and Rock & Sling; new work is forthcoming in Winter Tangerine Review and Bear Review. He recently translated the play Dreams by Günter Eich into English. Read more at memphisjon.wordpress.com.

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  • Theology Live

    Sep 14th, 2016
    6:30pm - 8:30pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    Led by the Reverend Broderick L. Greer, Curate at Grace-St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Theology Live is a free, public event and podcast sponsored by Grace-St. Luke’s. Theology Live wrestles with life's most compelling and unsettling questions. Over food and drink, guests and audience members are challenged to excavate the mines of culture, theology, and social justice.

    Joined by Emily Ballew Neff, Executive Director of the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, this session of the popular series looks at how art, specifically that of Yinka Shonibare MBE and his four sculptures, Rage of the Ballet Gods, on view in the museum’s Dunavant Rotunda, playfully touch on pagan mythology, globalization, dance, violence and climate change.

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  • Homeschool Day - Brooks Collection: Creativity in Contemporary Art

    Sep 15th, 2016
    10:00am - 2:00pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    Join us for our free homeschool day! 

    Homeschool families can choose from a variety of activities, including scavenger hunts, self-guided tours, gallery activities, a drop-in art-making activity, and a docent-led tour. 

    The art studio opens at 10 am and the tour begins at 11 am.

    Reservations are not required.

    Click here to learn more about the Brooks Homeschool Program.

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Sep 15th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

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  • Documentary Film: Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict

    Sep 16th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:40pm
    $5/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Director: Lisa Immordino Vreeland | USA | 2015 | 97 minutes

    A colorful character who was not only ahead of her time but helped to define it, Peggy Guggenheim was an heiress to her family fortune who became a central figure in the modern art movement. As she moved through the cultural upheaval of the 20th century, she collected not only art, but artists. Her colorful personal history included such figures as Samuel Beckett, Max Ernst, Jackson Pollock, Alexander Calder, Marcel Duchamp as well as countless others. While fighting through personal tragedy, she maintained her vision to build one of the most important collections of modern art, now enshrined in her Venetian palazzo.

    In the New York Times, film critic Daniel M. Gold writes, “Lisa Immordino Vreeland’s sleek, entertaining portrait of the collector and gallerist who assembled one of the great troves of Modern art cannot be accused of hagiography. From curators to historians to biographers, art world denizens describe Guggenheim’s flaws and failings: She had no formal training; she used art to promote herself; she was a narcissist. And that’s just in the first five minutes.”

    Continues Gold, “Vreeland has paced her documentary well, a chapter to each era, with hundreds of beautiful images spanning decades of artists, galleries, parties, scenes. She also makes good use of interviews Guggenheim gave to a biographer a couple of years before her death in 1979. On those tapes, she reveals little, but her clipped, rushed manner, so offputting to some, seems reasonable after a lifetime of being underestimated.”

    Please note that no advance tickets will be sold for our Friday matinee screenings.

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  • Foreign Film: A Brighter Summer Day

    Sep 17th, 2016
    2:00pm - 6:00pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Director: Edward Yang | Taiwan | 1991 | 237 minutes | Mandarin with English subtitles

    A Brighter Summer Day is based in 1960s Taiwan during a period of political unrest in which the previously liberated country came under rule by Chinese nationalists with support from the American military. This film tells the tale of youthful rebellion through the lens of a love story of two junior high schoolers and the gang wars that ensue. The title is taken from the Elvis song “Are You Lonesome Tonight?”

    J. Hoberman from the New York Times identifies A Brighter Summer Day as a “family drama that evokes Taiwan’s prolonged period of martial law,” and “is largely focused on high school turf wars and imported Elvis worship.”

    The original release of this film was in in Taiwan was 1991, but it was not released in the U.S. until 2011. Considered by Criterion Films to be the “masterpiece of Taiwanese cinema,” A Brighter Summer Day has made quite impact on contemporary film and was nominated for an Oscar in 1992. A Brighter Summer Day is an extremely ambitious film project, not only for its four hour run time, but also for the staggering 100 young inexperienced actors that director Edward Yang patiently trained.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.

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  • Teacher Open House featuring Brooks eMuseum

    Sep 21st, 2016
    3:00pm - 6:30pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    This dynamic and fun-filled event is designed just for teachers! 

    Come check out the new and redesigned galleries at the Brooks; learn about eMuseum, the Brooks’ collection online; enjoy art-making activities; pick up teacher resources; and more!

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Sep 22nd, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

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  • Tea & Tour for Seniors: Renaissance & Baroque Collection

    Sep 22nd, 2016
    2:00pm - 4:00pm
    $3 per person/Free for Brooks Members.

    Enjoy a leisurely tour of the museum’s collection of Renaissance and Baroque art, followed by tea and treats in the museum’s Terrace Room.

    Sponsored by the Brooks Museum League and H.W. Durham Foundation.

    $3 per person/Free for Brooks Members.

    Reservations required: 901.544.6244


    Andrea Previtali, Italian (Bergamasque-Venetian School), ca. 1470 - 1528 , The Annunciation, ca. 1520-1525 ,Tempera on wood panel, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art; Gift of the Samuel H. Kress Foundation  61.197.

     

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  • Foreign Film: Francofonia

    Sep 23rd, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:30pm
    $5/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Director: Aleksandr Sokurov | France | 2015 | 90 minutes | French with English subtitles

    Russian director Aleksandr Sokurov’s follow up to 2002’s Russian Ark, a single-take visit through St. Petersberg’s Hermitage Museum, is part documentary film, part narrative. The film promotes not just the history of the Louvre or the role of the museum in popular culture, but also the very idea of what it means to be human.

    Variety critic Jay Weissberg states that,A constant shuffling of layers is one of the film’s hallmarks: It cuts from deathbed photos of Chekhov and Tolstoy to a Skype conversation that Sokurov has with a ship captain, then shifts to the warm glow of 1940-set scenes. In between are lessons on the Louvre’s centuries-long construction; archival footage of Parisians getting on with their lives during the Nazi Occupation; reflections on how portraiture shaped European civilization; and the spirit of Napoleon walking the museum’s grand galleries, occasionally encountering the personification of France, Marianne.”

    “Does it all come together?” Weissberg asks. “Well, yes, if viewers think of the film as a freewheeling poetic essay, highly personal yet captivating. The pic’s core (or perhaps merely the hook?) is the relationship between Jaujard and Wolf Metternich, vanquished and conqueror, and how both men were intent on protecting the Louvre’s treasures. By the time the Nazis rolled into Paris in 1940, almost all the works of art had already been transferred to a series of safer chateaux across France, but the highly cultured, French-speaking German aristocrat would go on to defy his commanders and continue to keep France’s museum holdings protected from deportation to the Third Reich.”

    Please note that no advance tickets will be sold for our Friday matinee screenings.

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  • Cloar Circle Donor Reception & Opening of Carroll Cloar Gallery

    Sep 23rd, 2016
    5:30pm - 7:30pm
    Cloar Circle-level members.

    Be the first to see the museum’s new gallery dedicated a perennial Brooks favorite, Carroll Cloar. Join other Cloar Circle members to celebrate one of the South’s most famous painters.

    Cloar Circle-level members.

    RSVP

    Please RSVP by Wednesday, September 21.

    Not Cloar Circle-level member? Upgrade your membership online or call 901.544.6230.

     

           

     

     

     

     

     


    Carroll Cloar, American (active in Memphis), 1913-1993, My Father Was Big as a Tree, 1955, Casein tempera on Masonite, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Morrie A. Moss  55.24. ©Estate of the artist

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  • Brooks Membership: Tour de Cloar

    Sep 24th, 2016
    10:00am - 2:00pm
    Earle, Arkansas - Free to Brooks Membership

    Join Stanton Thomas, Ph.D., for a Carroll Cloar-themed bicycle ride through Crittenden County, Arkansas.

    The easy, flat, 6-mile ride across the Delta leaves the Crittenden County Museum in Earle at 10:00 am. You’ll see Rev. George Washington's funeral monument—that is, the famous “Angel in the Field,” as well as Gibson Bayou Church, The Earle Depot, and other sites immortalized in Cloar's work—as well as the endless, fecund fields and enormous skies of his paintings.

    Please meet at the Crittenden County Museum, 1112 Main Street, Earle, AR.

    Free to Brooks Membership.

    Please register by 2:30 pm, Wednesday, September 21.

    Register

    Not yet a member? Join or upgrade your membership online or call 901.544.6230.

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  • Tour: Regional Art featuring Carroll Cloar

    Sep 24th, 2016
    2:00pm - 3:00pm
    Included with museum admission/ Free for Brooks Membership and students with ID.

    Join us for a guided tour of regional art in the museum collection, including the new Carroll Cloar Gallery, led by one of our enthusiastic docents.

    Reservations are not required. First-come, first served basis. Tour starts promptly and space is limited.


    Carroll Cloar, American (active in Memphis), 1913-1993, Where the Southern Cross the Yellow Dog, 1965, Casein tempera on Masonite, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art; Brooks Fine Arts Foundation purchase  65.17. ©Estate of the artist

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  • Figure Drawing

    Sep 28th, 2016
    5:30pm - 7:30pm
    Free, or $5 donation to use museum supplies.

    Join artist and teacher Juan Rojo every other month to draw from a clothed model in museum galleries.

    Whether you’re an experienced artist or trying figure drawing for the first time, you’ll enjoy spending the evening drawing with others at the Brooks.

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  • Documentary Film: Eva Hesse

    Sep 28th, 2016
    7:00pm - 8:25pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Director: Marcie Begleiter | USA | 2016 | 82 minutes

    In the 1960s, German-Jewish born artist Eva Hesse was making quite a splash in the New York City art scene. Known for her abstract drawings and sculptures particularly in the media of fiberglass, latex, and plastic, Hesse is associated with the Postminimalist art movement. These days, her work is held by major museums such as the Pompidou and MOMA.

    A.O. Scott at the New York Times describes Eva Hesse as “Marcie Begleiter’s conscientious and moving documentary.” Eva Hesse, he says, “tells the full story of its subject’s tragically foreshortened life, but it focuses on those years of artistic emergence, a period of rapid development and furious productivity, with few parallels in the history of art. Hesse herself is both a ubiquitous presence in the film and something of a specter—an animating spirit and a ghost haunting the frames.”

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Sep 29th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

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  • Vin-A-Que

    Sep 30th, 2016
    6:00pm - 9:00pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art

    Vin-A-Que: The art of wine + swine

    Celebrate Memphis’ unique BBQ heritage and experience traditional and unique BBQ dishes paired with featured wines, specialty drinks, and craft beer all while you enjoy live music and a silent auction under the stars on the museum's plaza.

    Tickets are $75 each.

    Tickets


    The following restaurants are attending Vin-A-Que:
    Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen
    Babalu Tapas & Tacos
    Bounty on Broad
    Charlie Vergos Rendezvous
    Central BBQ
    Garibaldi’s Pizza
    Interim Restaurant & Bar
    Jim 'N Nick's BBQ
    Memphis Pizza Café - Overton Square
    MEMpopS
    Mosa Asian Bistro
    One & Only BBQ
    Payne’s Bar-B-Que
    Sweet Grass

    Musical entertainment by Mark Edgar Stuart.


    Vin-A-Que Host Committee
    Alayne & Paul Arbogast
    Stephanie Beliles
    Elaine & Brian Hartog
    Lauren & Andrew Patterson
    Natalie & John Rauscher
    Shibahn & Stephen Rodda
    Caley & Josh Spotts
    Grace & Ryan Skertich
    Cecilia Walker
    Leah & Judson Williford 

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  • Experimental Film: River of Fundament

    Oct 1st, 2016
    11:15am - 5:30pm
    $22/$15 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass

    Director: Matthew Barney | USA | 2014 | 5 hours 50 minutes

    In 2007, Matthew Barney and composer Jonathan Bepler began a new collaborative project inspired by American author Norman Mailer's 1983 novel Ancient Evenings, set in pharaonic Egypt. The project was conceived as a nontraditional opera with a series of one-time-only live acts performed across the American landscape over a five-year period. This opera developed as a film titled River of Fundament, which combines documentation of the three live acts with scenes set in a reconstruction of Norman Mailer's brownstone apartment in Brooklyn Heights.

    Barney and Bepler reimagine Mailer as his own protagonist who reincarnates three times in three different bodies by magically entering the womb of his wife Hathfertiti. In his attempt at rebirth, Norman must endure the departure of his soul's seven mythological states: the ren or secret name; the sekhem or power; the khu or light; the ba or spirit; the ka or double; the khabit or shadow; and finally the sekhu, or remains. With each incarnation the undead Norman emerges from a river of feces that runs beneath his Brooklyn Heights apartment and enters his own wake.

    Imagined as a memorial gathering attended by figures in the New York literary world, the wake takes place inside the Mailer apartment as it is ferried down the river. Guests eulogize Mailer and offer condolences to his widow, while musicians tune and begin play their instruments. Norman's widow and a chorus of guests contemplate the soul's journey as a series of recitatives. As the evening wears on, the wake gives way to a scene of carousing and revelry, in which characters from Ancient Evenings play out their incestuous struggles for power and their insatiable appetite for pleasure as the music gains momentum. Each incarnation of Norman joins the wake for a time, haunting the guests and challenging the ancient undead figures of gods and demigods. He endures two rebirths but fails to be reborn a third time, thus ending his attempt to ascend to a higher, more powerful state. Barney and Bepler have adopted critic Harold Bloom's suggestion that Ancient Evenings was a thinly-disguised allegory for Mailer's literary ambition. The powerful pharaoh Usermare evokes the spirit of Ernest Hemingway and engages Norman's three incarnations in a struggle for dominance.

    In a parallel narrative, River of Fundament replaces the body of Norman with the body of an automobile in the American landscape. Three generations of American cars act as vehicles that carry the narrative: a 1967 Chrysler Crown Imperial (known for its crashworthiness) is transmogrified into a 1979 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am (known as the last high-performance engine of the original muscle-car generation) and finally into a 2001 Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor (known for its tireless service in the U.S. government fleet).

    The automobiles' story begins with REN, a live performance staged at a car dealership in south Los Angeles. A 1967 Chrysler Crown Imperial undergoes its first death and is prepared for rebirth as a 1979 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am. The second performance, KHU, unfolds along the River Rouge and Detroit River. KHU brings the Chrysler back to its birthplace Detroit, a city rich in minerals, iron, and limestone, built upon the vast expanses of salt beds beneath Michigan. KHU sees the Chrysler Imperial dismembered and melted in five monumental furnaces. BA, the final live act, takes place at locations along New York City's East River, culminating in a battle at a dry dock in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. At the conclusion of BA, the automobile is further transformed into the 2001 Ford Crown Victoria.

    Set amid the American landscape, River of Fundament uses the language of modern industrial processing and recycling to tell the story of its automobile protagonist, alongside characters deployed from CREMASTER 3 (the Entered Apprentice and Entered Novitiate) and the Egyptian pantheon activated by Mailer (Osiris, Isis, Set, Nephthys, Horus, Anubis, and Khepera). The mythologies inherent to these characters are met at each site with a set of local mythologies, symbolisms, and indigenous musical traditions as diverse as Native American, American, Mayan, and Celtic. Each performance employs local talent, while the set of characters inherent to CREMASTER 3 and Egyptian mythology continue to evolve and reappear, pervading the transformation of the automobile protagonist as it endures the seven soul states toward the journey of its three embodiments.

    Sculpture is generated with each transformation of the automobile. The recurring motif of a graduated ascent to power is articulated in the material language of the metals and minerals that take form in sculpture. Base elements—zinc, sulfur, iron, copper—give way to yellow metal alloys—bronze and brass—that emulate, but fail to reproduce, the quality of gold.

    River of Fundament is characterized by musical performances directed according to the logic of the narrative: the story unfolds sculpturally, cinematically, and musically. Bepler uses speech and ambient rhythms as compositional elements, in addition to more traditionally-scored arias and recitatives. Sounds inherent to the landscape or action become part of the musical texture of the film, such that the setting itself becomes a musical instrument. The site-responsive nature of the music is also developed through the use of musicians, both professional and amateur, whose performances further establish a sense of place in each scene.

    Primarily excerpted from Mailer's Ancient Evenings, the libretto also includes historical rites from the Egyptian Book of the Dead and The Pyramid Texts, along with texts from American authors Walt Whitman, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and William S. Burroughs, offering a confluence of meditations on the timeless concerns of mortality and regeneration.

    Cast includes David Amram, Matthew Barney, Chief Dave Beautiful Bald Eagle, Ellen Burstyn, Dick Cavett, Madyn G. Coakley, Paul Giamatti, Milford Graves, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Deborah Harry, Joan La Barbara, Fran Lebowitz, John Buffalo Mailer, Jonas Mekas, Aimee Mullins, Stephen Payne, Eugene Perry, Herbert Perry, Salman Rushdie, Elaine Stritch, James Toback, and Lawrence Weiner.


    Presented worldwide on behalf of the artists by Manchester International Festival and distributed on behalf of the artists by International Film Circuit, River of Fundament screens at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art on Saturday, October 1 and Sunday, October 2.

    Screenings begin at 11:15 am each day. Tickets are $22, $15 for Brooks members and students with valid ID, and free for VIP Film Pass holders. There will be two 20-minute intermissions during each screening. No refunds; not recommended for viewers under 18.

    Advanced tickets are highly recommended for these screenings. Advance ticket sales will end at 2:30 pm on Monday, September 26. Any unsold tickets will be available in the rotunda beginning at 10 am on Saturday, October 1.

    Saturday, October 1 | 11:15 am Tickets

    Sunday, October 2 | 11:15 am Tickets


    River of Fundament may be too graphic for some viewers. The film intertwines literature, history and mythology with the contemplation of the fundamental human drives that have continuously propelled civilizations. Explicit scenes depict sex, violence and bodily functions. The film runs nearly six hours long with two 20-minute intermissions. No refunds will be offered. To prepare for the experience, we recommend watching the trailer here and visiting Matthew Barney’s River of Fundament website.

    More Details
  • Experimental Film: River of Fundament

    Oct 2nd, 2016
    11:15am - 5:30pm
    $22/$15 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass

    Director: Matthew Barney | USA | 2014 | 5 hours 50 minutes

    In 2007, Matthew Barney and composer Jonathan Bepler began a new collaborative project inspired by American author Norman Mailer's 1983 novel Ancient Evenings, set in pharaonic Egypt. The project was conceived as a nontraditional opera with a series of one-time-only live acts performed across the American landscape over a five-year period. This opera developed as a film titled River of Fundament, which combines documentation of the three live acts with scenes set in a reconstruction of Norman Mailer's brownstone apartment in Brooklyn Heights.

    Barney and Bepler reimagine Mailer as his own protagonist who reincarnates three times in three different bodies by magically entering the womb of his wife Hathfertiti. In his attempt at rebirth, Norman must endure the departure of his soul's seven mythological states: the ren or secret name; the sekhem or power; the khu or light; the ba or spirit; the ka or double; the khabit or shadow; and finally the sekhu, or remains. With each incarnation the undead Norman emerges from a river of feces that runs beneath his Brooklyn Heights apartment and enters his own wake.

    Imagined as a memorial gathering attended by figures in the New York literary world, the wake takes place inside the Mailer apartment as it is ferried down the river. Guests eulogize Mailer and offer condolences to his widow, while musicians tune and begin play their instruments. Norman's widow and a chorus of guests contemplate the soul's journey as a series of recitatives. As the evening wears on, the wake gives way to a scene of carousing and revelry, in which characters from Ancient Evenings play out their incestuous struggles for power and their insatiable appetite for pleasure as the music gains momentum. Each incarnation of Norman joins the wake for a time, haunting the guests and challenging the ancient undead figures of gods and demigods. He endures two rebirths but fails to be reborn a third time, thus ending his attempt to ascend to a higher, more powerful state. Barney and Bepler have adopted critic Harold Bloom's suggestion that Ancient Evenings was a thinly-disguised allegory for Mailer's literary ambition. The powerful pharaoh Usermare evokes the spirit of Ernest Hemingway and engages Norman's three incarnations in a struggle for dominance.

    In a parallel narrative, River of Fundament replaces the body of Norman with the body of an automobile in the American landscape. Three generations of American cars act as vehicles that carry the narrative: a 1967 Chrysler Crown Imperial (known for its crashworthiness) is transmogrified into a 1979 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am (known as the last high-performance engine of the original muscle-car generation) and finally into a 2001 Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor (known for its tireless service in the U.S. government fleet).

    The automobiles' story begins with REN, a live performance staged at a car dealership in south Los Angeles. A 1967 Chrysler Crown Imperial undergoes its first death and is prepared for rebirth as a 1979 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am. The second performance, KHU, unfolds along the River Rouge and Detroit River. KHU brings the Chrysler back to its birthplace Detroit, a city rich in minerals, iron, and limestone, built upon the vast expanses of salt beds beneath Michigan. KHU sees the Chrysler Imperial dismembered and melted in five monumental furnaces. BA, the final live act, takes place at locations along New York City's East River, culminating in a battle at a dry dock in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. At the conclusion of BA, the automobile is further transformed into the 2001 Ford Crown Victoria.

    Set amid the American landscape, River of Fundament uses the language of modern industrial processing and recycling to tell the story of its automobile protagonist, alongside characters deployed from CREMASTER 3 (the Entered Apprentice and Entered Novitiate) and the Egyptian pantheon activated by Mailer (Osiris, Isis, Set, Nephthys, Horus, Anubis, and Khepera). The mythologies inherent to these characters are met at each site with a set of local mythologies, symbolisms, and indigenous musical traditions as diverse as Native American, American, Mayan, and Celtic. Each performance employs local talent, while the set of characters inherent to CREMASTER 3 and Egyptian mythology continue to evolve and reappear, pervading the transformation of the automobile protagonist as it endures the seven soul states toward the journey of its three embodiments.

    Sculpture is generated with each transformation of the automobile. The recurring motif of a graduated ascent to power is articulated in the material language of the metals and minerals that take form in sculpture. Base elements—zinc, sulfur, iron, copper—give way to yellow metal alloys—bronze and brass—that emulate, but fail to reproduce, the quality of gold.

    River of Fundament is characterized by musical performances directed according to the logic of the narrative: the story unfolds sculpturally, cinematically, and musically. Bepler uses speech and ambient rhythms as compositional elements, in addition to more traditionally-scored arias and recitatives. Sounds inherent to the landscape or action become part of the musical texture of the film, such that the setting itself becomes a musical instrument. The site-responsive nature of the music is also developed through the use of musicians, both professional and amateur, whose performances further establish a sense of place in each scene.

    Primarily excerpted from Mailer's Ancient Evenings, the libretto also includes historical rites from the Egyptian Book of the Dead and The Pyramid Texts, along with texts from American authors Walt Whitman, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and William S. Burroughs, offering a confluence of meditations on the timeless concerns of mortality and regeneration.

    Cast includes David Amram, Matthew Barney, Chief Dave Beautiful Bald Eagle, Ellen Burstyn, Dick Cavett, Madyn G. Coakley, Paul Giamatti, Milford Graves, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Deborah Harry, Joan La Barbara, Fran Lebowitz, John Buffalo Mailer, Jonas Mekas, Aimee Mullins, Stephen Payne, Eugene Perry, Herbert Perry, Salman Rushdie, Elaine Stritch, James Toback, and Lawrence Weiner.


    Presented worldwide on behalf of the artists by Manchester International Festival and distributed on behalf of the artists by International Film Circuit, River of Fundament screens at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art on Saturday, October 1 and Sunday, October 2.

    Screenings begin at 11:15 am each day. Tickets are $22, $15 for Brooks members and students with valid ID, and free for VIP Film Pass holders. There will be two 20-minute intermissions during each screening. No refunds; not recommended for viewers under 18.

    Advanced tickets are highly recommended for these screenings. Advance ticket sales will end at 2:30 pm on Monday, September 26. Any unsold tickets will be available in the rotunda beginning at 10 am on Saturday, October 1.

    Saturday, October 1 | 11:15 am Tickets

    Sunday, October 2 | 11:15 am Tickets


    River of Fundament may be too graphic for some viewers. The film intertwines literature, history and mythology with the contemplation of the fundamental human drives that have continuously propelled civilizations. Explicit scenes depict sex, violence and bodily functions. The film runs nearly six hours long with two 20-minute intermissions. No refunds will be offered. To prepare for the experience, we recommend watching the trailer here and visiting Matthew Barney’s River of Fundament website.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Oct 6th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Oct 13th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Oct 20th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Oct 27th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Nov 3rd, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Nov 10th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Nov 17th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Nov 24th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details