• Cult Film: Little Fugitive

    Dec 7th, 2016
    7:00pm - 8:30pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    This landmark film directly influenced the French New Wave via its naturalistic style and the groundbreaking use of nonprofessional actors in leading roles. Nominated for an Academy Award in the category of Best Writing, Little Fugitive was also awarded the prestigious Silver Lion at the 1953 Venice Film Festival. In 1997, it was selected for preservation in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry.

    Filmed on location at Coney Island and in Brooklyn, New York, Little Fugitive resembles a Red Grooms painting come to life. In the film, seven-year-old Joey Norton runs away from home after mistakenly thinking he has shot and killed his older brother. Frightened with threats of imprisonment, Joey flees to Coney Island, where he enjoys pony rides and the arcades before spending the night under the boardwalk. Upon its release in 1953, the New York Times described it as “a candid study of a Brooklyn kid… a wondrous illustration of the eccentricities of a small boy, adrift on his own resources in a tiny and tawdry mob playground.”

    Little Fugitive features incredible camera work by Morris Engel, who used a concealed strap-on camera, a prototype for the Steadicam, to capture thousands of beach-going New Yorkers as unwitting extras. As François Truffaut said, “Our New Wave would never have come into being if it hadn’t been for the young American, Morris Engel, who showed us the way with Little Fugitive.”

    Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Red Grooms: Traveling Correspondent, on view though January 8.

    Directors: Ray Ashley, Morris Engel & Ruth Orkin | USA | 1953 | 80 minutes

    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Dec 8th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

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  • Foreign Film: Blancanieves

    Dec 9th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:30pm
    $5/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Spanish filmmaker Pablo Berger transports the opulent fantasy of Snow White to circa-1920s Andalusia in his homage to both the Brothers Grimm and silent cinema. In Berger’s breathtaking rendition of the all-t0o-familiar fairy tale, Snow White’s father is a famous matador; the cruel stepmother is his nurse; and the seven dwarves are a troupe of diminutive bullfighters known as Los Enanitos Toreros.

    In one of his final reviews, the late film critic Roger Ebert wrote of Blancanieves,Although the story draws on the Brothers Grimm and the legend of Snow White, it is anything but a children's movie. It is a full-bodied silent film of the sort that might have been made by the greatest directors of the 1920s, if such details as the kinky sadomasochism of this film's evil stepmother could have been slipped past the censors.”

    Director: Pablo Berger | Spain | 2012 | 90 minutes

    $5/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Please note that no advance tickets will be sold for our Friday matinee screenings.

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  • Documentary Film: The Silence of Mark Rothko

    Dec 11th, 2016
    2:00pm - 3:00pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    "He wanted the viewer to step into the painting. What he aimed for was not a consumption of art, but a dialogue. He thought that art could transform the public."

    —Annie Cohen-Solal, Mark Rothko biographer

    Painter Mark Rothko is best known for imposing canvasses that eschew representation in favor of pure color and texture—using them to express fundamental human emotions. In The Silence Of Mark Rothko, we visit Rothko's studio at 22 Bowery in New York, and go to Florence's Museo di san Marco, where the monastic work of Renaissance painter Fra Angelico deeply influenced Rothko's mission to create environments and not just paintings. In The Hague, filmmaker Marjoleine Boonstra introduces us to curator Franz Kaiser of the Gemeentemuseum, as his team installs the works for the first major Rothko exhibit to be held in Holland in 40 years.

    The film includes thoughtful, engaging commentary from experts including Rothko's biographer, Annie Cohen-Solal, and conservator Carol Mancusi-Ungaro (who speculates on whether splotches of paint on the studio floor may have been Rothko's). Fittingly though, for a film about a painter whose greatest works evoke both silence and emotion, The Silence Of Mark Rothko lingers on paintings and locations—using architectural shots, interiors and streetscapes to link Rothko's work to the world he inhabited.

    Featuring works from his early mythological period, his classic color field paintings, his later “Black on Grey” pieces, and the Rothko Chapel in Houston, the film is a unique artistic biography that provides a heightened level of intimacy and familiarity with its subject's work through carefully chosen visuals and interviews. Interspersed throughout are readings from the painter's writings by his son, Christopher—passages that illuminate and bring immediacy to Rothko's work and philosophy.

    Director: Marjoleine Boonstra | Netherlands | 2016 | 52 minutes

    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.

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  • Documentary Film: Call Her Applebroog

    Dec 14th, 2016
    7:00pm - 8:15pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Renowned underground filmmaker Beth B captures this poignant and intimate portrait of her mother, painter, sculptor and filmmaker Ida Applebroog, whose work often explores the themes of gender, sexual identity, violence and politics. The film documents Applebroog’s groundbreaking work and her dramatic struggle to overcome adversity as a woman who was raised in an Orthodox Jewish household by an immigrant father who only wanted to have sons.

    A cathartic story of self-realization which depicts the act of art-making as a life-saving parachute, Call Her Applebroog depicts the artist, who is now in her 80s and archiving her work, as she looks back at decades of expression through creative practice. For Applebroog, art represents the possibility of growth and self-preservation, and her work repeatedly broaches those power struggles that are ever-present in human relationships.

    Director: Beth B | USA | 2016 | 70 minutes

    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Dec 15th, 2016
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

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  • Feature Film: On the Road

    Dec 16th, 2016
    1:00pm - 3:20pm
    $5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    This adaptation of Jack Kerouac’s seminal novel, directed by Walter Salles and executive produced by Francis Ford Coppola, is based on the years Kerouac spent traversing 1940s-era America with Neal Cassady and other Beat Generation figures, including Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs.

    The story itself remains a defining work of the postwar Beat Generation told against a backdrop of jazz, poetry, and drug use. The narrator, Sal Paradise, and his friend Dean Moriarty, hit the American highways between 1947 and 1950,traveling by bus, hitchhiking, and automobile from the east coast to such far-flung locales as San Francisco, New Orleans, Denver, and Mexico City.  The book influenced an entire generation of musicians, poets and writers, including Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Jim Morrison, and Hunter S. Thompson.

    Previous attempts to bring On the Road to the silver screen failed, including a 1957 deal Kerouac nearly made with Paramount Pictures, which reportedly included Marlon Brando in the lead role of Dean Moriarty. Years later, Coppola made multiple attempts at adapting the book with Brad Pitt and later, Colin Farrell in the same role. Ultimately, Coppola handpicked the Brazilian-born Salle, director of The Motorcycle Diaries, to take the helm.

    When the final product was released, reviews were mixed, and the film grossed a scant $744,296 domestically. Nevertheless, it stands as an interesting example of a great work of literature that was difficult to adapt—and perhaps should never have been adapted—to the screen.

    Director: Walter Salles | USA | 2012 | 137 minutes | Rated R

    $5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Please note that no advance tickets will be sold for our Friday matinee screenings.

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  • Upstander Film Series: At the River I Stand

    Jan 4th, 2017
    7:00pm - 8:00pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    At the River I Stand chronicles the 1968 AFSCME sanitation workers’ strike in Memphis and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., tracing the tumultuous events that unfolded here over two fateful months. What began as a local strike by AFSCME sanitation workers for human dignity and a living wage eventually captured national attention and drew Dr. King to Memphis, along with the assassin who would kill him. It was a turning point in the Civil Rights Movement and the national struggle for racial and economic justice.

    At the River I Stand was awarded the 1994 Erik Barnouw Award for Best Documentary by the Organization of American Historians. The documentary brings into sharp relief issues that remain urgent by examining the connection between economic and civil rights, debating strategies for change, and illuminating the fight for dignity for all working people.

    Directors: David Appleby, Allison Graham & Steve Ross | USA | 1993 | 56 minutes

    Free.


    Facing History and Ourselves is proud to partner with the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in presenting the Upstander Film Series in January 2017. Every Wednesday night, the museum will show a film that celebrates stories of individuals that have embraced the challenge to speak out, stand up for others, and make decisions that help create positive change in our world. Following each screening, Facing History and Ourselves will facilitate a discussion with the audience and the creative minds behind the films.

     

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Jan 5th, 2017
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Art Therapy Information Session

    Jan 8th, 2017
    2:00pm - 3:30pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    Join us to learn about the profession and practice of art therapy.

    The Brooks’ Art Therapy Access Program art therapists, Paige Scheinberg, MS, ATR and Sarah Hamil, LCSW, RPT-S, ATR-BC will introduce you to the history, treatment goals, unique benefits, and settings in which you may find and/or utilize an art therapist.

    Participants interested in becoming an art therapist will also learn about the education and training needed to become a credentialed art therapist.

    Reservations are recommended.

    RSVP
     

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  • Upstander Film Series: Watchers of the Sky

    Jan 11th, 2017
    7:00pm - 9:00pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    The winner of three prizes at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, including the Grand Jury Prize for Documentary, Watchers of the Sky uncovers the forgotten life of Raphael Lemkin—the man who created the word “genocide” and believed the law could protect the world from mass atrocities. Inspired by the Pulitzer Prize-winning book A Problem From Hell, written by United States Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power, the film depicts the journey of Lemkin, a lawyer, and his efforts in lobbying the United Nations to establish the Genocide Convention, which was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in December 1948. The resolution defines genocide in legal terms, mandating all participating countries to prevent and punish acts of genocide in war and peacetime.

    Using Lemkin’s legacy as its guide, Watchers of the Sky interweaves four stories of remarkable courage, compassion, and determination, taking viewers on a provocative journey from Nuremberg to The Hague, from Bosnia to Darfur, from criminality to justice, and from apathy to action. It discusses several instances of genocide throughout history, including the Armenian Genocide, the Rwandan Genocide, the War in Darfur, and the Holocaust.

    Director: Edet Belzberg | USA | 2014 | 120 minutes

    Free.


    Facing History and Ourselves is proud to partner with the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in presenting the Upstander Film Series in January 2017. Every Wednesday night, the museum will show a film that celebrates stories of individuals that have embraced the challenge to speak out, stand up for others, and make decisions that help create positive change in our world. Following each screening, Facing History and Ourselves will facilitate a discussion with the audience and the creative minds behind the films.

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Jan 12th, 2017
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

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  • DUNCAN PHYFE: MASTER CABINETMAKER OF EARLY 19TH-CENTURY NEW YORK: Lecture & Master Class with Matthew Thurlow

    Jan 14th, 2017
    10:30am - 11:30am
    Included with museum admission.

    A DECORATIVE ARTS TRUST EVENT

    Among the most lauded figures in the annals of American furniture history, Duncan Phyfe was a successful and prolific cabinetmaker in own his lifetime who returned to prominence with the birth of the American antiques market in the early twentieth century. While much has been written about Phyfe's furniture and clientele, the Metropolitan Museum of Art's recent exhibition and catalog offered a more accurate look at objects firmly documented to his workshop as well as the competition he faced from contemporaries such as Michael Allison and the Parisian emigré Honoré Lannuier.

    Mr. Thurlow, a co-author of the exhibition catalog, will bring Phyfe's illustrious career to life through a presentation highlighting the significant furniture held in public and private collections across the country. After his talk he will conduct a master class in the galleries.

    Given in recognition of the gifts of Mrs. Tina McWhorter and her late husband, John.

    Included with museum admission.


    Attributed to Duncan Phyfe, 1770-1854, Scottish, active New York City, Side Chair, ca. 1810, Mahogany with later upholstery, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art; Gift of the Decorative Arts Trust 2013.3.1.

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  • Documentary Film: Dale Sanders: Source to Sea

    Jan 14th, 2017
    2:00pm - 3:00pm
    $5/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    The Wolf River Conservancy presents the Memphis premiere of this new documentary film about Memphian Dale Sanders, a world-record holder, champion spear fisherman, photographer, river trailblazer, godfather of river-angels, recreation specialist, and the oldest man to have solo paddled the entire Mississippi River. Sanders celebrated his eightieth birthday on the banks of the Mississippi River with a surprise party on June 14, 2015, less than a month after he began his solo journey in a specially designed Wenonah Canoe named for his grandniece, Anna.

    Sanders—also known as the Grey Beard Adventurer— completed his full-length traverse, traveling some 2,320 miles from the Mississippi’s source in Lake Itasca, Minnesota, to the Gulf of Mexico over a three-month period. That’s 80 paddling days, one for each year of age and wisdom. With the culmination of his journey, he successfully became the oldest man to ever solo paddle the entire distance of the Mississippi River.

    Although a solo endeavor, Sanders was accompanied approximately eighty-five percent of the trip by his fellow paddler, Richard Sojourner. Even though he had to stop his paddle for a short time, Sojourner was able to complete the entire trip in 2015. He will also be present at the premiere to add his insight into this greatest of adventures.

    This summer, Sanders won Canoe and Kayak Magazine’s Spirit of Adventure Award, a prestigious honor given to the person who most inspires others to pursue outdoor adventures. He also completed the grueling MR340 race from Kansas City to St. Charles, Missouri, as part of a team paddling a three-man SUP board. For more information on this illustrious outdoorsman, visit www.greybeardadventurer.com.

    Before the film, join Sanders and other paddlers in the Memphis community for a free reception hosted by Wolf River Conservancy, beginning at 12:30 pm.

    Dale Sanders: Source to Sea is sponsored by Wolf River Conservancy.

    Directors: Austin Graham, Brad Tallent & Coltin Calloway | USA | 2016 | 60 minutes

    $5/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

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  • Intrude Member Opening

    Jan 18th, 2017
    5:30pm - 7:30pm
    Free to Brooks Membership.

    Experience the latest Brooks Outside exhibition, featuring artist Amanda Parer’s Intrude, with other Brooks members.

    Please RSVP by Monday, January16.

    RSVP


    Not a member? Call 901 544 6230 or join online.

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  • Upstander Film Series: The Interrupters

    Jan 18th, 2017
    7:00pm - 9:10pm
    Free to Brooks Membership.

    Hoop Dreams filmmaker Steve James delivers a moving and surprising story of three individuals who try to protect their Chicago communities from the violence they once employed. Filming over the course of a year, he follows Ameena, Cobe and Eddie as they undergo journeys of hope and redemption during a period marked by high-profile incidents including the brutal beating of high schooler Derrion Albert, whose death was caught on videotape.

    The Interrupters documents the year that Chicago emerged as a national symbol for the violence in American cities. It takes viewers into a myriad of troubled communities on Chicago’s South Side described as the “Black Belt,” where gangs like the Gangster Disciples and the Black P Stones reign supreme. There, members of an innovative organization called CeaseFire, an initiative of the Chicago Project for Violence Prevention, treat the spread of violence like scientists treat the spread of infectious diseases: They go after the most infected, and strive to stop the infection at its source.

    The Interrupters premiered at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival and has won numerous awards, including “Best Documentary” at the 2012 Independent Spirit Awards. As Boston Globe film critic Wesley Morris noted, “The immediacy and caprice of violence in The Interrupters are just as strong as in nearly every documentary I’ve seen about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.”

     Director: Steve James | USA | 2011 | 125 minutes

    Free.


    Facing History and Ourselves is proud to partner with the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in presenting the Upstander Film Series in January 2017. Every Wednesday night, the museum will show a film that celebrates stories of individuals that have embraced the challenge to speak out, stand up for others, and make decisions that help create positive change in our world. Following each screening, Facing History and Ourselves will facilitate a discussion with the audience and the creative minds behind the films.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Jan 19th, 2017
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Classic Film: Harvey

    Jan 21st, 2017
    2:00pm - 3:20pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    In this classic  farce, adapted from Mary Chase’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play, James Stewart stars as Elwood P. Dowd, a middle-aged eccentric whose best friend is a pooka named Harvey—who takes the form of an invisible six-foot-three-inch tall rabbit. Family and friends are unsure whether Dowd’s obsession with Harvey is due to his propensity to drink, or mental illness. When Dowd’s sister, Veta Louise Simmons, attempts to have him committed to an insane asylum, wacky hijinks ensue. Will Formula 977 stop Dowd from “seeing the rabbit?” Or is it everyone else who is crazy?

    Stewart received an Academy Award nomination for his role; his co-star, Josephine Hull, who portrayed Simmons, took home an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress. In recent years, Harvey appeared on the American Film Institute’s list of the ten best American fantasy films of all time, coming in at number seven.

    Harvey is presented in conjunction with Intrude, an exhibition on view outside the Brooks in late January 2017.

    Director: Henry Koster | USA | 1950 | 104 minutes

    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.


    About Brooks Outside: Intrude

    Intrude consists of five giant illuminated inflatable rabbits, the largest of which is approximately 23 feet high, 10 feet wide and 16 feet long. Created by Australian artist Amanda Parer (b. 1971), this installation first appeared at Vivid Festival of Light in Sydney and has traveled to the United States, United Kingdom, France, Canada, Scotland, Denmark, Italy, and Belgium.

    On view at the Brooks January 18 – 22 and 25 – 29, Intrude explores the natural world, its fragility, and our role within it. Rabbits in Parer’s native Australia are out of control pests, leaving a trail of ecological destruction wherever they go and defying attempts at eradication. First introduced by white settlers in 1788 they have caused a great imbalance to the country’s endemic species.

    The rabbit also is an animal of contradiction. It represents the fairytale animal from our childhood—a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields. Intrude deliberately evokes this image, and a strong visual humor, to lure you into the artwork only to reveal the more serious environmental messages behind it.

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  • Horror Film: Night of the Lepus

    Jan 22nd, 2017
    2:00pm - 3:30pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    This horror film, based on the 1964 science fiction novel The Year of the Angry Rabbit, depicts a small Arizona town whose citizens must battle thousands of mutated carnivorous rabbits. Starring numerous Western character actors that director William F. Claxton had previously worked with—including Rory Calhoun, DeForest Kelley, and Stuart Whitman—as well as Psycho star Janet Leigh as a scientist who tries to use hormones to stop the killer rabbits, Night of the Lepus was universally panned upon release.

    The film gained quick notoriety for its poor plot, stilted acting, and bad direction. The nearly laughable special effects included smearing ketchup on the faces of domesticated rabbits in lieu of blood. In some scenes, rabbits were depicted stomping on miniature structures in slow motion. For others, human actors wore rabbit costumes. Legendary New York Times film critic Vincent Canby noted that despite these attempts to make the rabbits look “huge and scary,” they “still look like Easter bunnies.” John Kenneth Muir, author of Horror Films of the 1970s, deemed Night of the Lepus the “most ridiculous horror film ever conceived,” praising the cast for keeping “straight faces as they heroically stand against the onslaught of the bunnies.”

    Night of the Lepus is presented in conjunction with Intrude, an exhibition on view outside the Brooks in late January 2017.

    Director: William F. Claxton | USA | 1972 | 88 minutes

    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.


    About Brooks Outside: Intrude

    Intrude consists of five giant illuminated inflatable rabbits, the largest of which is approximately 23 feet high, 10 feet wide and 16 feet long. Created by Australian artist Amanda Parer (b. 1971), this installation first appeared at Vivid Festival of Light in Sydney and has traveled to the United States, United Kingdom, France, Canada, Scotland, Denmark, Italy, and Belgium.

    On view at the Brooks January 18 – 22 and 25 – 29, Intrude explores the natural world, its fragility, and our role within it. Rabbits in Parer’s native Australia are out of control pests, leaving a trail of ecological destruction wherever they go and defying attempts at eradication. First introduced by white settlers in 1788 they have caused a great imbalance to the country’s endemic species.

    The rabbit also is an animal of contradiction. It represents the fairytale animal from our childhood—a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields. Intrude deliberately evokes this image, and a strong visual humor, to lure you into the artwork only to reveal the more serious environmental messages behind it.

    More Details
  • Figure Drawing

    Jan 25th, 2017
    5:30pm - 7:30pm
    Free, or $5 donation to use museum supplies.

    Join artist and teacher Juan Rojo every other month to draw from a clothed model in museum galleries.

    Whether you’re an experienced artist or trying figure drawing for the first time, you’ll enjoy spending the evening drawing with others at the Brooks.

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  • Upstander Film Series: What Tomorrow Brings

    Jan 25th, 2017
    7:00pm - 8:30pm
    Memphis Brooks Museum of Art | Free.

    In Afghanistan today, there is no social issue more controversial than women’s rights. And nothing cuts to the heart of the matter more than the education of young girls because nothing so radically threatens to change a deeply patriarchal society than rising generations of educated women.

    As recounted in What Tomorrow Brings, in 2009, when Razia Jan, a visionary and fearless educator, arrived in the war-blasted village of Deh’Subz to open the Zabuli Education Center, she placed herself at the center of her country’s turmoil. She faced families and village elders hostile to female education, threats (and nearby examples) of Taliban violence against schools for girls and the haunting question of what would happen when U.S. forces withdrew. To sustain herself, she had her own resourcefulness, the passion of her teachers and, perhaps most surprisingly in a conservative rural setting, the free-spirited determination of the girls themselves to get an education.

    The film is a powerful example of what happens when learning extends far beyond reading, writing and arithmetic. Here, girls have the space to dream of—and pursue—a life different from the one they were born into. One of the most striking features is the daily joy, curiosity and intellectual engagement of the girls in school—and the defiant or impish ruses they sometimes use to get there.“Nobody has the right to prevent girls from getting an education,” Razia tells her students. “If you were home you’d be washing clothes and sweeping. Your family would think of you like this flower. Theirs to protect or destroy. But this flower says, ‘Here I stand. Strong. Even if you try to destroy me I will bloom again and I will be beautiful.’”

    Director: Beth Murphy | USA | 2015 | 90 minutes

    Free.


    Facing History and Ourselves is proud to partner with the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in presenting the Upstander Film Series in January 2017. Every Wednesday night, the museum will show a film that celebrates stories of individuals that have embraced the challenge to speak out, stand up for others, and make decisions that help create positive change in our world. Following each screening, Facing History and Ourselves will facilitate a discussion with the audience and the creative minds behind the films.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Jan 26th, 2017
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Contemporary Art Public Tour

    Jan 28th, 2017
    2:00pm - 3:00pm
    Included with museum admission/Free Brooks Membership.

    Join us for a docent led tour of contemporary art in the Brooks permanent collection.

    No reservation required; first come, first served; space is limited.


    Roger Brown, American, 1941-1997, Clouds Over Alabama, 1994, Oil on canvas, Memphis Brooks Museum of Art Purchase; funds provided by the Thomas W. Briggs Foundation Community Service Award in honor of Kaywin Feldman, with additional support from Mimi Loeb  2006.22. © The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and the Brown Family

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  • Animated Film: The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie

    Jan 28th, 2017
    2:00pm - 3:40pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    A compilation of classic Looney Tunes shorts with bridge sequences hosted by Bugs Bunny, the animated Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie consists of more than two dozen cartoons including the masterpieces Duck Amuck, Ali Baba Bunny, What’s Opera, Doc? and Duck Dodgers in the 241/2 Century. Art and pop culture references abound, from Daffy Duck’s portrayal of Robin Hood in Robin Hood Daffy and the Batman outfit Wile E. Coyote wears in Gee Whiz-z-z-z-z-z-z to the “set” modeled after Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater house, which is used in the bridge sequences. Pratfalls, rivalries, battles and chases abound in this animated classic, which features Mel Blanc as the voice of dozens of Looney Tunes characters, including Bugs, Daffy, Porky Pig, Wile E. Coyote, and Road Runner, and music by Carl Stalling.

    The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie is presented in conjunction with Intrude, an exhibition on view outside the Brooks in late January 2017.

    Directors: Chuck Jones & Phil Monroe | USA | 1979 | 98 minutes

    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.


    About Brooks Outside: Intrude

    Intrude consists of five giant illuminated inflatable rabbits, the largest of which is approximately 23 feet high, 10 feet wide and 16 feet long. Created by Australian artist Amanda Parer (b. 1971), this installation first appeared at Vivid Festival of Light in Sydney and has traveled to the United States, United Kingdom, France, Canada, Scotland, Denmark, Italy, and Belgium.

    On view at the Brooks January 18 – 22 and 25 – 29, Intrude explores the natural world, its fragility, and our role within it. Rabbits in Parer’s native Australia are out of control pests, leaving a trail of ecological destruction wherever they go and defying attempts at eradication. First introduced by white settlers in 1788 they have caused a great imbalance to the country’s endemic species.

    The rabbit also is an animal of contradiction. It represents the fairytale animal from our childhood—a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields. Intrude deliberately evokes this image, and a strong visual humor, to lure you into the artwork only to reveal the more serious environmental messages behind it.

    More Details
  • Classic Film: Monty Python and the Holy Grail

    Jan 29th, 2017
    2:00pm - 3:30pm
    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Recognized as one of the greatest comedy films of all time, this 1974 parody of the sixth century quest to find the Holy Grail stars Monty Python regulars Graham Chapman, John Cleese, Terry Gilliam, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, and Michael Palin as King Arthur, Sir Lancelot, Patsy, Sir Robin, Sir Belvedere, and Sir Galahad. Hilariously low budget, the slapstick comedy employs sound-effect coconuts to emulate thundering horses’ hooves, and features a real “Killer Rabbit” which battles the knights. 

    The Killer Rabbit of Caerbannog, or the Legendary Black Beast of Aaaaarrrrrrggghhh, named for the final utterance of anyone who ever saw it, faces off against King Arthur and his knights in a major battle. According to Monty Python lore, the idea for the scene was taken from an illustration on the façade of Notre Dame de Paris, which illustrates the weakness of cowardice by depicting a knight fleeing from a rabbit. In another pivotal scene in the film, the Knights of the Round Table attempt to breech a French castle via a Trojan Rabbit, yet they forget to hide inside before it’s brought inside the castle keep.

    Monty Python and the Holy Grail is presented in conjunction with Intrude, an exhibition on view outside the Brooks in late January 2017.

    Directors: Terry Gilliam & Terry Jones | UK | 1974 | 91 minutes

    $9/$5 Brooks members and students with valid ID/Free with VIP Film Pass.

    Tickets

    Tickets are available online until 2:30 pm the day of the screening or 2:30 pm on Friday for weekend matinees. Tickets are also available at Visitor Services, or by calling 901.544.6208 during regular business hours. Unsold tickets are also available in the rotunda immediately preceding a screening.


    About Brooks Outside: Intrude

    Intrude consists of five giant illuminated inflatable rabbits, the largest of which is approximately 23 feet high, 10 feet wide and 16 feet long. Created by Australian artist Amanda Parer (b. 1971), this installation first appeared at Vivid Festival of Light in Sydney and has traveled to the United States, United Kingdom, France, Canada, Scotland, Denmark, Italy, and Belgium.

    On view at the Brooks January 18 – 22 and 25 – 29, Intrude explores the natural world, its fragility, and our role within it. Rabbits in Parer’s native Australia are out of control pests, leaving a trail of ecological destruction wherever they go and defying attempts at eradication. First introduced by white settlers in 1788 they have caused a great imbalance to the country’s endemic species.

    The rabbit also is an animal of contradiction. It represents the fairytale animal from our childhood—a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields. Intrude deliberately evokes this image, and a strong visual humor, to lure you into the artwork only to reveal the more serious environmental messages behind it.

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Feb 2nd, 2017
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

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  • Yoga Thursdays

    Feb 9th, 2017
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Feb 16th, 2017
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Feb 23rd, 2017
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details
  • Yoga Thursdays

    Mar 2nd, 2017
    1:00pm - 2:00pm
    Pay what it's worth.

    Misti Rae Holton leads a vinyasa yoga class in our breathtaking Schilling Gallery every Thursday.

    Bring your own mat and a towel or small blanket.

    Due to the proximity of art, no water allowed. Limited class size.

    More Details