A Temporary Farewell to Brooks Museum’s Vide-O-belisk

One of the most photographed—and shared on social media—works at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art is Nam June Paik’s Vide-O-belisk. This sculpture comprises vintage televisions, neon signs, and videos featuring works from the museum’s permanent collection, Egyptian iconography, and Elvis.

Vide-O-belisk, which was commissioned by the museum with funds from the Morrie A. Moss Acquisition Fund, the Hohenberg Foundation, Wil and Sally Hergenrader, and the Bodine Company, has graced the museum’s Dunavant Rotunda for the last 13 years.

As we turn 100 this year, we’re instituting many new initiatives and taking on a multitude of new projects throughout the museum building itself and into the community. One of these changes is the temporary deinstallation of Paik’s work to make room for a series of soon-to-be announced projects for the rotunda.

Beginning February 1, we will begin the process of disassembling the sculpture into its constituent 24 pieces. A thorough conservation assessment will also take place—the first in its 13-year history at the Brooks.

Paik, known as the father of video art, created this iconic sculpture in 2002. Its exploration of the themes of technology, communication, and music has resonated with thousands of museum visitors over the years.

Watch this video of compiled visitor Instagram images of Vide-O-belisk.



Share your favorite photos of Paik’s Vide-O-belisk with us using the hashtag #BrooksMuseum.


Nam June Paik
South Korean, b. 1932
Vide-O-belisk, 2002
Vintage television cabinets, neon elements, and video
Commissioned by the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art; funds provided by the Morrie A. Moss Acquisition Fund, the Hohenberg Foundation, Wil and Sally Hergenrader, and the Bodine Company
Memphis Brooks Museum of Art 2002.4


Posted by Karen Davis at 8:38 AM
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